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postgraduate thesis: Night eating and sleep problems in Hong Kong adolescents : a cross-sectional study

TitleNight eating and sleep problems in Hong Kong adolescents : a cross-sectional study
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Mok, H. [莫海茵]. (2015). Night eating and sleep problems in Hong Kong adolescents : a cross-sectional study. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5662713
AbstractBackground: Night eating or eating late at night, such as having night snacks or late dinner, has gained popularity in recent years. Eating near bedtime has been speculated to affect sleep, but such studies are few. Adequate and good quality sleep are important for both physical and mental health, especially in young people. The present study investigated the association between night eating and sleep problems in adolescents. Methods: The Hong Kong Student Obesity Surveillance (HKSOS) project was a cross-sectional study conducted in 2006/07. 42 secondary schools were randomly selected by stratified cluster sampling and 26618 students aged 12-18 were included after data cleaning. The weekly frequency of night snacks of students was categorized as no (no), 1 to 4 days (occasional) and 5+ days (frequent). Usual dinner time and bed time in school days and non-school days were used for calculating dinner-bed intervals. Intervals of equal to or less than 3 hours were classified as short. They were then grouped as having no short intervals (no), having a short interval on either school days or non-school days, and both school days and non-school days. The dependent variables were sleep problems. Students were also asked if they had difficulty initiating sleep (DIS), difficulty maintaining sleep (DMS), early morning awakening (EMA), difficulty breathing during sleep (DBS) and snoring in the previous month. Having either DIS, DMS, or EMA was defined as insomnia. The presence of doctor-diagnosed sleep apnoea was also reported. Logistic regression was then used and school cluster effects were accounted for. Age, sex, socioeconomic status, weight status, psychological status, alcohol drinking and smoking were adjusted for. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) were reported. Results: Compared with no night snacking, frequent night snacking was associated with sleep apnoea (AOR 2.04, 95% CI 1.30-3.20; P for trend 0.004). In addition, DBS was associated with occasional (1.34, 95% CI 1.12-1.62) and frequent (1.74, 95% CI 1.31-2.31) night snacking. The corresponding AORs of snoring were (1.27, 95% CI 1.10-1.46) and (1.26, 95% CI 1.08-1.48). Moreover, the AORs (95% CI) of sleep apnoea were 1.84 (95% CI 1.14-2.97) for having short dinner-bed intervals on both school days and non-school days. DBS was associated with short dinner-bed intervals on either types of days 1.22 (95% CI 1.02-1.47) and both types of days 1.88 (95% CI 1.55-2.29). The corresponding AORs of snoring were 1.25 (95% CI 1.07-1.46) and 2.06 (95% CI 1.79-2.37). Occasional night snacking was associated with significantly higher risk of DIS (1.12, 1.04-1.22; P for trend 0.004). The AORs of DIS were 0.88 (95% CI 0.81-0.95) for having short dinner-bed intervals on either school days or non-school days and 0.65 (95% CI 0.57-0.74) for both types of days (P for trend <0.001). Conclusions: Night eating (night snacking and short dinner-bed interval) was associated with sleep apnoea, DBS and snoring in Hong Kong adolescents. Future studies are warranted to confirm these novel findings.
DegreeMaster of Public Health
SubjectFood habits - China - Hong Kong
Sleep disorders in adolescence - China - Hong Kong
Dept/ProgramPublic Health
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221790

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, Hoi-yan-
dc.contributor.author莫海茵-
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-09T00:21:14Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-09T00:21:14Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationMok, H. [莫海茵]. (2015). Night eating and sleep problems in Hong Kong adolescents : a cross-sectional study. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5662713-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221790-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Night eating or eating late at night, such as having night snacks or late dinner, has gained popularity in recent years. Eating near bedtime has been speculated to affect sleep, but such studies are few. Adequate and good quality sleep are important for both physical and mental health, especially in young people. The present study investigated the association between night eating and sleep problems in adolescents. Methods: The Hong Kong Student Obesity Surveillance (HKSOS) project was a cross-sectional study conducted in 2006/07. 42 secondary schools were randomly selected by stratified cluster sampling and 26618 students aged 12-18 were included after data cleaning. The weekly frequency of night snacks of students was categorized as no (no), 1 to 4 days (occasional) and 5+ days (frequent). Usual dinner time and bed time in school days and non-school days were used for calculating dinner-bed intervals. Intervals of equal to or less than 3 hours were classified as short. They were then grouped as having no short intervals (no), having a short interval on either school days or non-school days, and both school days and non-school days. The dependent variables were sleep problems. Students were also asked if they had difficulty initiating sleep (DIS), difficulty maintaining sleep (DMS), early morning awakening (EMA), difficulty breathing during sleep (DBS) and snoring in the previous month. Having either DIS, DMS, or EMA was defined as insomnia. The presence of doctor-diagnosed sleep apnoea was also reported. Logistic regression was then used and school cluster effects were accounted for. Age, sex, socioeconomic status, weight status, psychological status, alcohol drinking and smoking were adjusted for. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) were reported. Results: Compared with no night snacking, frequent night snacking was associated with sleep apnoea (AOR 2.04, 95% CI 1.30-3.20; P for trend 0.004). In addition, DBS was associated with occasional (1.34, 95% CI 1.12-1.62) and frequent (1.74, 95% CI 1.31-2.31) night snacking. The corresponding AORs of snoring were (1.27, 95% CI 1.10-1.46) and (1.26, 95% CI 1.08-1.48). Moreover, the AORs (95% CI) of sleep apnoea were 1.84 (95% CI 1.14-2.97) for having short dinner-bed intervals on both school days and non-school days. DBS was associated with short dinner-bed intervals on either types of days 1.22 (95% CI 1.02-1.47) and both types of days 1.88 (95% CI 1.55-2.29). The corresponding AORs of snoring were 1.25 (95% CI 1.07-1.46) and 2.06 (95% CI 1.79-2.37). Occasional night snacking was associated with significantly higher risk of DIS (1.12, 1.04-1.22; P for trend 0.004). The AORs of DIS were 0.88 (95% CI 0.81-0.95) for having short dinner-bed intervals on either school days or non-school days and 0.65 (95% CI 0.57-0.74) for both types of days (P for trend <0.001). Conclusions: Night eating (night snacking and short dinner-bed interval) was associated with sleep apnoea, DBS and snoring in Hong Kong adolescents. Future studies are warranted to confirm these novel findings.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshFood habits - China - Hong Kong-
dc.subject.lcshSleep disorders in adolescence - China - Hong Kong-
dc.titleNight eating and sleep problems in Hong Kong adolescents : a cross-sectional study-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5662713-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Public Health-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePublic Health-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-

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