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Article: The increasing proportion of acute myocardial infarction represented by the uninsured: a growing financial burden in the United States.(Report)

TitleThe increasing proportion of acute myocardial infarction represented by the uninsured: a growing financial burden in the United States.(Report)
Authors
KeywordsHeart Attack – Risk Factors
Heart Attack – Care and Treatment
Health Insurance – Usage
Issue Date2014
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://circ.ahajournals.org
Citation
Circulation, 2014, v. 130 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Under the provisions of the Affordable Care Act, insurance coverage will markedly increase with the Congressional Budgetary Office estimating the number of insured to increase by approximately 13 million in 2014 and 25 million in 2016. However, approximately 31 million non-elderly US citizens are expected to remain without health insurance in 2016. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains a source of significant morbidity and mortality, as well as cost to society. No prior studies have examined temporal rates of uninsured among patients presenting with an AMI using a nationally representative database. Hypothesis: We tested the hypothesis that the proportion of uninsured individuals with AMI and cost of uninsured to society will vary by year. Methods: We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), which contains estimates from approximately 8 million hospital visits and information related to number of discharges, aggregate charges, and principal diagnoses of all patients discharged in the US. We calculated the percentage of acute myocardial infarction by insurance status, and the sum of all charges of hospital stays in the US adjusted for inflation. Results: The cost to society due to acute myocardial infarction in the uninsured increased substantially from 1997 to 2012, with total cost in 1997 of $852,596,272 and $3,446,893,954 in 2012 after adjustment for inflation. In addition, although rates of AMI decreased in the general population (from 268.6/100,000 individuals in 1997 to 193.8/100,000 individuals in 2012), the proportion of individuals with AMI who were uninsured increased (from 3.83% in 1997 to 7.37% in 2012). Conclusions: The proportion of those experiencing AMI who are uninsured is rising, as is cost to society. It remains to be seen what the effects of expanding health insurance will have on the rate of AMI as well as proportion of AMI represented by the uninsured.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221667
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 17.047
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.853

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDoran, B-
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Y-
dc.contributor.authorXu, J-
dc.contributor.authorBangalore, S-
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-04T15:28:59Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-04T15:28:59Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationCirculation, 2014, v. 130-
dc.identifier.issn0009-7322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221667-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Under the provisions of the Affordable Care Act, insurance coverage will markedly increase with the Congressional Budgetary Office estimating the number of insured to increase by approximately 13 million in 2014 and 25 million in 2016. However, approximately 31 million non-elderly US citizens are expected to remain without health insurance in 2016. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains a source of significant morbidity and mortality, as well as cost to society. No prior studies have examined temporal rates of uninsured among patients presenting with an AMI using a nationally representative database. Hypothesis: We tested the hypothesis that the proportion of uninsured individuals with AMI and cost of uninsured to society will vary by year. Methods: We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), which contains estimates from approximately 8 million hospital visits and information related to number of discharges, aggregate charges, and principal diagnoses of all patients discharged in the US. We calculated the percentage of acute myocardial infarction by insurance status, and the sum of all charges of hospital stays in the US adjusted for inflation. Results: The cost to society due to acute myocardial infarction in the uninsured increased substantially from 1997 to 2012, with total cost in 1997 of $852,596,272 and $3,446,893,954 in 2012 after adjustment for inflation. In addition, although rates of AMI decreased in the general population (from 268.6/100,000 individuals in 1997 to 193.8/100,000 individuals in 2012), the proportion of individuals with AMI who were uninsured increased (from 3.83% in 1997 to 7.37% in 2012). Conclusions: The proportion of those experiencing AMI who are uninsured is rising, as is cost to society. It remains to be seen what the effects of expanding health insurance will have on the rate of AMI as well as proportion of AMI represented by the uninsured.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://circ.ahajournals.org-
dc.relation.ispartofCirculation-
dc.subjectHeart Attack – Risk Factors-
dc.subjectHeart Attack – Care and Treatment-
dc.subjectHealth Insurance – Usage-
dc.titleThe increasing proportion of acute myocardial infarction represented by the uninsured: a growing financial burden in the United States.(Report)-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXu, J: xujf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityXu, J=rp02086-
dc.identifier.volume130-

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