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Article: The impact of phonological neighborhood density on typical and atypical emerging lexicons

TitleThe impact of phonological neighborhood density on typical and atypical emerging lexicons
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of Child Language, 2014, v. 41, n. 3, p. 634-657 How to Cite?
AbstractAccording to the Extended Statistical Learning account (ExSL; Stokes, Kern & dos Santos, 2012) late talkers (LTs) continue to use neighborhood density (ND) as a cue for word learning when their peers no longer use a density learning mechanism. In the current article, LTs expressive (active) lexicon ND values differed from those of their age-matched, but not language-matched, TD peers, a finding that provided support for the ExSL account. Stokes (2010) claimed that LTs had difficulty abstracting sparse words, but not dense, from the ambient language. If true, then LTs' receptive (passive), as well as active lexicons should be comprised of words of high ND. However, in the current research only active lexicons were of high ND. LTs' expressive lexicons may be small not because of an abstraction deficit, but because they are unable to develop sufficiently strong phonological representations to support word production. © 2013 Cambridge University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221443
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.174
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.787

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStokes, Stephanie F.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-19T03:37:00Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-19T03:37:00Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Child Language, 2014, v. 41, n. 3, p. 634-657-
dc.identifier.issn0305-0009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221443-
dc.description.abstractAccording to the Extended Statistical Learning account (ExSL; Stokes, Kern & dos Santos, 2012) late talkers (LTs) continue to use neighborhood density (ND) as a cue for word learning when their peers no longer use a density learning mechanism. In the current article, LTs expressive (active) lexicon ND values differed from those of their age-matched, but not language-matched, TD peers, a finding that provided support for the ExSL account. Stokes (2010) claimed that LTs had difficulty abstracting sparse words, but not dense, from the ambient language. If true, then LTs' receptive (passive), as well as active lexicons should be comprised of words of high ND. However, in the current research only active lexicons were of high ND. LTs' expressive lexicons may be small not because of an abstraction deficit, but because they are unable to develop sufficiently strong phonological representations to support word production. © 2013 Cambridge University Press.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Child Language-
dc.titleThe impact of phonological neighborhood density on typical and atypical emerging lexicons-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S030500091300010X-
dc.identifier.pmid23651703-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84882453362-
dc.identifier.volume41-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage634-
dc.identifier.epage657-
dc.identifier.eissn1469-7602-

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