File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Neighborhood density and word frequency predict vocabulary size in toddlers

TitleNeighborhood density and word frequency predict vocabulary size in toddlers
Authors
KeywordsNeighborhood density
Late talkers
Vocabulary development
Word frequency
Issue Date2010
Citation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2010, v. 53, n. 3, p. 670-683 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To document the lexical characteristics of neighborhood density (ND) and word frequency (WF) in the lexicons of a large sample of English-speaking toddlers. Method: Parents of 222 British-English-speaking children aged 27(±3) months completed a British adaptation of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory: Words and Sentences (MCDI; Klee & Harrison, 2001). Child words were coded for ND and WF, and the relationships among vocabulary, ND, and WF were examined. A cut-point of -1 SD below the mean on the MCDI classified children into one of two groups: low or high vocabulary size. Group differences on ND and WF were examined using nonparametric statistics. Results: In a hierarchical regression, ND and WF accounted for 47% and 14% of unique variance in MCDI scores, respectively. Low-vocabulary children scored significantly higher on ND and significantly lower on WF than did high-vocabulary children, but there was more variability in ND and WF for children at the lowest points of the vocabulary continuum. Conclusion: Children at the lowest points of a continuum of vocabulary size may be extracting statistical properties of the input language in a manner quite different from their more able age peers. © American Speech-Language- Hearing Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221435
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.526
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.970

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStokes, Stephanie F.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-19T03:36:59Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-19T03:36:59Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2010, v. 53, n. 3, p. 670-683-
dc.identifier.issn1092-4388-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221435-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To document the lexical characteristics of neighborhood density (ND) and word frequency (WF) in the lexicons of a large sample of English-speaking toddlers. Method: Parents of 222 British-English-speaking children aged 27(±3) months completed a British adaptation of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory: Words and Sentences (MCDI; Klee & Harrison, 2001). Child words were coded for ND and WF, and the relationships among vocabulary, ND, and WF were examined. A cut-point of -1 SD below the mean on the MCDI classified children into one of two groups: low or high vocabulary size. Group differences on ND and WF were examined using nonparametric statistics. Results: In a hierarchical regression, ND and WF accounted for 47% and 14% of unique variance in MCDI scores, respectively. Low-vocabulary children scored significantly higher on ND and significantly lower on WF than did high-vocabulary children, but there was more variability in ND and WF for children at the lowest points of the vocabulary continuum. Conclusion: Children at the lowest points of a continuum of vocabulary size may be extracting statistical properties of the input language in a manner quite different from their more able age peers. © American Speech-Language- Hearing Association.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research-
dc.subjectNeighborhood density-
dc.subjectLate talkers-
dc.subjectVocabulary development-
dc.subjectWord frequency-
dc.titleNeighborhood density and word frequency predict vocabulary size in toddlers-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0254)-
dc.identifier.pmid20530381-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953349664-
dc.identifier.volume53-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage670-
dc.identifier.epage683-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats