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Article: A phonemic implicational feature hierarchy of phonological contrasts for english-speaking children

TitleA phonemic implicational feature hierarchy of phonological contrasts for english-speaking children
Authors
KeywordsDevelopment
Implicational hierarchy
Phonological assessment
Phonology
Phonological disorders
Issue Date2005
Citation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2005, v. 48, n. 4, p. 817-833 How to Cite?
AbstractContrastive feature hierarchies have been developed and used for some time in depicting typical phonological development and in guiding therapy decisions. Previous descriptions of feature use have been based on independent analyses and usually phonetic inventories. However, recent trends in phonology include a relational analysis of phonemic inventories (D. Ingram & K. D. Ingram, 2001). The current investigation was a relational analysis of the phonemic inventories of 40 typically developing 2-year-old American-English-speaking children. Consonant inventories were derived from spontaneous speech samples using the Logical International Phonetics Programs computer software (D. K. Oller & R. E. Delgado, 1999). Cluster analysis was used to determine the grouping of contrastive features. Four levels emerged. Level I included [consonant], [sonorant], and [coronal], Level II included [voice], Level III included [anterior], [continuant], and [nasal], and Level IV included [lateral] and [strident]. Results suggested that the resulting 4-level phonemic feature hierarchy might be used to classify the phonological systems of children with phonological disorders. © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221426
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.526
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.970

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStokes, SF-
dc.contributor.authorKlee, T-
dc.contributor.authorCarson, CP-
dc.contributor.authorCarson, D-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-19T03:36:57Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-19T03:36:57Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2005, v. 48, n. 4, p. 817-833-
dc.identifier.issn1092-4388-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221426-
dc.description.abstractContrastive feature hierarchies have been developed and used for some time in depicting typical phonological development and in guiding therapy decisions. Previous descriptions of feature use have been based on independent analyses and usually phonetic inventories. However, recent trends in phonology include a relational analysis of phonemic inventories (D. Ingram & K. D. Ingram, 2001). The current investigation was a relational analysis of the phonemic inventories of 40 typically developing 2-year-old American-English-speaking children. Consonant inventories were derived from spontaneous speech samples using the Logical International Phonetics Programs computer software (D. K. Oller & R. E. Delgado, 1999). Cluster analysis was used to determine the grouping of contrastive features. Four levels emerged. Level I included [consonant], [sonorant], and [coronal], Level II included [voice], Level III included [anterior], [continuant], and [nasal], and Level IV included [lateral] and [strident]. Results suggested that the resulting 4-level phonemic feature hierarchy might be used to classify the phonological systems of children with phonological disorders. © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research-
dc.subjectDevelopment-
dc.subjectImplicational hierarchy-
dc.subjectPhonological assessment-
dc.subjectPhonology-
dc.subjectPhonological disorders-
dc.titleA phonemic implicational feature hierarchy of phonological contrasts for english-speaking children-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1044/1092-4388(2005/057)-
dc.identifier.pmid16378476-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-29144536645-
dc.identifier.volume48-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage817-
dc.identifier.epage833-

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