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Article: Good longterm survival after primary living donor liver transplantation for solitary hepatocellular carcinomas up to 8 cm in diameter

TitleGood longterm survival after primary living donor liver transplantation for solitary hepatocellular carcinomas up to 8 cm in diameter
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
HPB, 2014, v. 16, n. 8, p. 749-757 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives There is controversy over whether hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) should be primarily treated with living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) if liver resection (LR) can be effective. This retrospective study was conducted to compare survival outcomes in patients treated with either modality for solitary HCC measuring ≤8 cm in diameter. Methods Outcomes in patients with solitary HCC primarily treated by LDLT were analysed. Patients with solitary HCC of similar sizes with or without microvascular invasion primarily treated with LR were selected at a ratio of 6 : 1 for comparison. Results In-hospital mortality amounted to 0% and 1.3% in the LDLT (n = 50) and LR (n = 300) groups, respectively (P = 0.918). Complication rates were 34% and 20% in the LDLT and LR groups, respectively (P = 0.027). Rates of 1-, 3-, 5- and 10-year overall survival were 98%, 94%, 89% and 83%, respectively, in the LDLT group and 95%, 85%, 76% and 56%, respectively, in the LR group (P = 0.013). Rates of 1-, 3-, 5- and 10-year disease-free survival were 96%, 90%, 87% and 81%, respectively, in the LDLT group and 81%, 64%, 57% and 40%, respectively, in the LR group (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Living donor liver transplantation surpassed LR in survival outcomes, achieving a 10-year overall survival rate 1.5 times as high and a 10-year disease-free survival rate twice as high as those facilitated by LR. However, it entailed more complications, in addition to the inevitable risks to the donor. © 2014 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221367
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.918
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.586

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDai, WC-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SC-
dc.contributor.authorChok, KSH-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, TT-
dc.contributor.authorSharr, WW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, ACY-
dc.contributor.authorTsang, SHY-
dc.contributor.authorFung, JYY-
dc.contributor.authorPoon, RTP-
dc.contributor.authorFan, ST-
dc.contributor.authorLo, CM-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-18T06:09:07Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-18T06:09:07Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationHPB, 2014, v. 16, n. 8, p. 749-757-
dc.identifier.issn1365-182X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221367-
dc.description.abstractObjectives There is controversy over whether hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) should be primarily treated with living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) if liver resection (LR) can be effective. This retrospective study was conducted to compare survival outcomes in patients treated with either modality for solitary HCC measuring ≤8 cm in diameter. Methods Outcomes in patients with solitary HCC primarily treated by LDLT were analysed. Patients with solitary HCC of similar sizes with or without microvascular invasion primarily treated with LR were selected at a ratio of 6 : 1 for comparison. Results In-hospital mortality amounted to 0% and 1.3% in the LDLT (n = 50) and LR (n = 300) groups, respectively (P = 0.918). Complication rates were 34% and 20% in the LDLT and LR groups, respectively (P = 0.027). Rates of 1-, 3-, 5- and 10-year overall survival were 98%, 94%, 89% and 83%, respectively, in the LDLT group and 95%, 85%, 76% and 56%, respectively, in the LR group (P = 0.013). Rates of 1-, 3-, 5- and 10-year disease-free survival were 96%, 90%, 87% and 81%, respectively, in the LDLT group and 81%, 64%, 57% and 40%, respectively, in the LR group (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Living donor liver transplantation surpassed LR in survival outcomes, achieving a 10-year overall survival rate 1.5 times as high and a 10-year disease-free survival rate twice as high as those facilitated by LR. However, it entailed more complications, in addition to the inevitable risks to the donor. © 2014 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofHPB-
dc.titleGood longterm survival after primary living donor liver transplantation for solitary hepatocellular carcinomas up to 8 cm in diameter-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/hpb.12212-
dc.identifier.pmid24467735-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84904363505-
dc.identifier.hkuros228574-
dc.identifier.volume16-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage749-
dc.identifier.epage757-
dc.identifier.eissn1477-2574-

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