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Book Chapter: Biodiversity State and Trends in Southeast Asia

TitleBiodiversity State and Trends in Southeast Asia
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherAcademic Press
Citation
Biodiversity State and Trends in Southeast Asia. In Levin, S (Ed.), Encyclopedia of biodiversity (2nd ed.), p. 509-527. Amsterdam: Academic Press, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractSoutheast Asia, which encompasses four biodiversity hotspots (Indo-Burma, Sundaland, the Philippines, and Wallacea), is a region of remarkably high biodiversity. Much of the region’s flora and fauna is not found elsewhere in the world (endemic). Unfortunately, this region has been experiencing widespread and rapid deforestation and forest degradation over the last few decades, driven primarily by industrial agriculture, such as oil palm development. In this article, the authors discuss the status of key natural ecosystems and taxonomic groups. Additionally, they highlight the major threats to biodiversity as well as the challenges and opportunities for conservation in this region.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221143
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKoh, LP-
dc.contributor.authorKettle, CJ-
dc.contributor.authorSheil, D-
dc.contributor.authorLee, TM-
dc.contributor.authorGiam, X-
dc.contributor.authorGibson, LG-
dc.contributor.authorClement, GR-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-02T10:06:27Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-02T10:06:27Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationBiodiversity State and Trends in Southeast Asia. In Levin, S (Ed.), Encyclopedia of biodiversity (2nd ed.), p. 509-527. Amsterdam: Academic Press, 2013-
dc.identifier.isbn9780123847195-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221143-
dc.description.abstractSoutheast Asia, which encompasses four biodiversity hotspots (Indo-Burma, Sundaland, the Philippines, and Wallacea), is a region of remarkably high biodiversity. Much of the region’s flora and fauna is not found elsewhere in the world (endemic). Unfortunately, this region has been experiencing widespread and rapid deforestation and forest degradation over the last few decades, driven primarily by industrial agriculture, such as oil palm development. In this article, the authors discuss the status of key natural ecosystems and taxonomic groups. Additionally, they highlight the major threats to biodiversity as well as the challenges and opportunities for conservation in this region.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAcademic Press-
dc.relation.ispartofEncyclopedia of biodiversity (2nd ed.)-
dc.titleBiodiversity State and Trends in Southeast Asia-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailGibson, LG: lgibson@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityGibson, LG=rp01958-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-12-384719-5.00357-9-
dc.identifier.spage509-
dc.identifier.epage527-
dc.publisher.placeAmsterdam-

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