File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Neighboring groups and habitat edges modulate range use in Phayre's leaf monkeys (Trachypithecus phayrei crepusculus)

TitleNeighboring groups and habitat edges modulate range use in Phayre's leaf monkeys (Trachypithecus phayrei crepusculus)
Authors
KeywordsEdge effects
Territory borders
Neighbor avoidance
Home range use
Issue Date2012
Citation
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2012, v. 66, n. 4, p. 633-643 How to Cite?
AbstractAn animal's use of space may be strongly influenced by habitat edges and neighboring conspecifics encountered in and around its home range. Habitat edges are known to affect species density and distribution, but their impact on home range use is largely unknown. Additionally, among large animals, interactions with neighbors become particularly important as increasing home range size leads to decreasing exclusivity of resource use, but the effect of neighbors on home range use remains poorly understood. Here, we examine the influence of neighbors and habitat edges on the ranging patterns of three groups of Phayre's leaf monkeys (Trachypithecus phayrei crepusculus) in northeast Thailand over a period of more than 2 years. The study animals occupied dry evergreen forest, and adjacent patches of dry dipterocarp forest created a habitat edge and formed barriers between some groups. We found that the use of home range interiors was 50-90% higher than the border areas, indicating concentrated use of resources within the home range. The use of peripheral areas was influenced by social organization, the presence of neighboring groups, and forest edges. While one multimale group showed no particular habitat preference, two single-male groups preferred areas bordering dry dipterocarp habitat and avoided areas bordering neighboring groups, suggesting that the threat of neighbors mediated border presence. Additionally, groups may have been attracted to the forest edge, where conspecific competitors are absent and increased sunlight may increase resource abundance and/or quality. This study revealed that the use of border areas can be modulated by neighboring groups and habitat edges, thereby adding to our understanding of home range use among territorial species in heterogeneous habitats. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221135
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.382
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.373

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Luke-
dc.contributor.authorKoenig, Andreas-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-02T08:46:35Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-02T08:46:35Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2012, v. 66, n. 4, p. 633-643-
dc.identifier.issn0340-5443-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221135-
dc.description.abstractAn animal's use of space may be strongly influenced by habitat edges and neighboring conspecifics encountered in and around its home range. Habitat edges are known to affect species density and distribution, but their impact on home range use is largely unknown. Additionally, among large animals, interactions with neighbors become particularly important as increasing home range size leads to decreasing exclusivity of resource use, but the effect of neighbors on home range use remains poorly understood. Here, we examine the influence of neighbors and habitat edges on the ranging patterns of three groups of Phayre's leaf monkeys (Trachypithecus phayrei crepusculus) in northeast Thailand over a period of more than 2 years. The study animals occupied dry evergreen forest, and adjacent patches of dry dipterocarp forest created a habitat edge and formed barriers between some groups. We found that the use of home range interiors was 50-90% higher than the border areas, indicating concentrated use of resources within the home range. The use of peripheral areas was influenced by social organization, the presence of neighboring groups, and forest edges. While one multimale group showed no particular habitat preference, two single-male groups preferred areas bordering dry dipterocarp habitat and avoided areas bordering neighboring groups, suggesting that the threat of neighbors mediated border presence. Additionally, groups may have been attracted to the forest edge, where conspecific competitors are absent and increased sunlight may increase resource abundance and/or quality. This study revealed that the use of border areas can be modulated by neighboring groups and habitat edges, thereby adding to our understanding of home range use among territorial species in heterogeneous habitats. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology-
dc.subjectEdge effects-
dc.subjectTerritory borders-
dc.subjectNeighbor avoidance-
dc.subjectHome range use-
dc.titleNeighboring groups and habitat edges modulate range use in Phayre's leaf monkeys (Trachypithecus phayrei crepusculus)-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00265-011-1311-2-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84858153097-
dc.identifier.volume66-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage633-
dc.identifier.epage643-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats