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Student Project: Is 'oil pulling' a 'snake oil'? : a clinical trial

TitleIs 'oil pulling' a 'snake oil'? : a clinical trial
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Chan, W., Chu, D. R. J., Fung, K. K., Law, Y. W., Lee, C. T., Mak, C., Tam, K., Wong, W. D., Wu, C.. (2015). Is 'oil pulling' a 'snake oil'? : a clinical trial. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.
AbstractThe traditional Ayurveda practice of ‘oil pulling’ has become a recent phenomenon and concerns about its efficacy have been raised. Objectives: (1) to determine awareness about the practice of ‘oil pulling’ among a group of young adults, and to determine variations in awareness with respect to socio-demographic factors, oral health behaviours (oral hygiene and dental attendance) and use of natural health products; (2) to determine the effectiveness of ‘oil pulling’ and conventional oral hygiene practice compared to the use of conventional oral hygiene practice alone in terms of oral hygiene and (3) to determine the effectiveness of ‘oil pulling’ and conventional oral hygiene practice compared to the use of conventional oral hygiene practice alone in terms of gingival health. Methods: Group members recruited seventy-four young adults to participate in a clinical trial over a two-month period comparing the effectiveness of (a) ‘oil pulling’ and conventional oral hygiene methods (toothbrush and toothpaste) versus (b) conventional oral hygiene methods alone. Oral hygiene was assessed using the Plaque Index - PI (Silness and Löe, 1964) and the proportion of sites with visible plaque (PVP). Gingival health was assessed using the Gingival Index – GI (Silness and Löe,1963) and the proportion of sites with gingival bleeding (PGB). Participants were block randomized in groups of four to a cross over clinical trial and assessments were conducted at one-month and two-months. Results: Approximately a quarter (28.4%, 21) of participants was aware of the practice of ‘oil pulling’. Awareness of the practice was associated with reported use of natural dental/oral health products (p<0.01). From baseline to one-month there was a significant improvement in proportion of sites with visible plaque among the test group (p<0.01). However, there was no significant difference between both groups (p>0.05). There were observed significant differences in gingival health among both the test and control groups from baseline to one-month (p<0.01) but no significant differences between them (p>0.05). No significant differences were observed in oral health parameters from one-month to two-month among neither the test nor control groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Awareness of the practice of ‘oil pulling’ is relatively common and is associated with use of natural dental/oral health products. Findings from the clinical trial failed to support the adjunct use of ‘oil pulling’ in addition to conventional oral hygiene practices.
SubjectYoung adults - Dental care - China - Hong Kong
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221063
Series/Report no.Community health project (University of Hong Kong. Faculty of Dentistry) ; no. 197

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Wing-kiu-
dc.contributor.authorChu, Dick-hei, Ryan Julian-
dc.contributor.authorFung, Ka-wing, Karen-
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Yew Wooi-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Cheuk-sze, Tracy-
dc.contributor.authorMak, Chun-hung-
dc.contributor.authorTam, King-man-
dc.contributor.authorWong, Wing-kin, Dennis-
dc.contributor.authorWu, Ching-hong-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-24T04:11:19Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-24T04:11:19Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationChan, W., Chu, D. R. J., Fung, K. K., Law, Y. W., Lee, C. T., Mak, C., Tam, K., Wong, W. D., Wu, C.. (2015). Is 'oil pulling' a 'snake oil'? : a clinical trial. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221063-
dc.description.abstractThe traditional Ayurveda practice of ‘oil pulling’ has become a recent phenomenon and concerns about its efficacy have been raised. Objectives: (1) to determine awareness about the practice of ‘oil pulling’ among a group of young adults, and to determine variations in awareness with respect to socio-demographic factors, oral health behaviours (oral hygiene and dental attendance) and use of natural health products; (2) to determine the effectiveness of ‘oil pulling’ and conventional oral hygiene practice compared to the use of conventional oral hygiene practice alone in terms of oral hygiene and (3) to determine the effectiveness of ‘oil pulling’ and conventional oral hygiene practice compared to the use of conventional oral hygiene practice alone in terms of gingival health. Methods: Group members recruited seventy-four young adults to participate in a clinical trial over a two-month period comparing the effectiveness of (a) ‘oil pulling’ and conventional oral hygiene methods (toothbrush and toothpaste) versus (b) conventional oral hygiene methods alone. Oral hygiene was assessed using the Plaque Index - PI (Silness and Löe, 1964) and the proportion of sites with visible plaque (PVP). Gingival health was assessed using the Gingival Index – GI (Silness and Löe,1963) and the proportion of sites with gingival bleeding (PGB). Participants were block randomized in groups of four to a cross over clinical trial and assessments were conducted at one-month and two-months. Results: Approximately a quarter (28.4%, 21) of participants was aware of the practice of ‘oil pulling’. Awareness of the practice was associated with reported use of natural dental/oral health products (p<0.01). From baseline to one-month there was a significant improvement in proportion of sites with visible plaque among the test group (p<0.01). However, there was no significant difference between both groups (p>0.05). There were observed significant differences in gingival health among both the test and control groups from baseline to one-month (p<0.01) but no significant differences between them (p>0.05). No significant differences were observed in oral health parameters from one-month to two-month among neither the test nor control groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Awareness of the practice of ‘oil pulling’ is relatively common and is associated with use of natural dental/oral health products. Findings from the clinical trial failed to support the adjunct use of ‘oil pulling’ in addition to conventional oral hygiene practices.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofCommunity Health Project-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCommunity health project (University of Hong Kong. Faculty of Dentistry) ; no. 197-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshYoung adults - Dental care - China - Hong Kong-
dc.titleIs 'oil pulling' a 'snake oil'? : a clinical trial-
dc.typeStudent_Project-
dc.identifier.hkulb5576813-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros243650-

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