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postgraduate thesis: Fostering creativity : perceptions and practices of gifted education teachers

TitleFostering creativity : perceptions and practices of gifted education teachers
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Chan, S. [陳穗寧]. (2015). Fostering creativity : perceptions and practices of gifted education teachers. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5572977
AbstractThis thesis investigated the beliefs about creativity and the creativity-fostering classroom practices that were held by Hong Kong primary teachers who were involved in gifted education. Other aspects that were examined included the personal and environmental factors that affected such practices, and the relationship between a creative personality, creativity beliefs, and creativity-fostering behaviors. Differences between teachers involved directly in gifted education and those who were not were also explored. A mixed-methods approach was employed involving two studies. Study One used in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 10 teachers who were trained in creativity and involved in gifted education activities in their schools. The interviews examined these teachers’ beliefs concerning creativity, their practices for creativity enhancement, and the factors influencing the use of such practices. It was possible to categorize the teachers’ beliefs in terms of the characteristics of a creative individual, the creative process, the creative product, the ultimate value of creativity, and environments that were conducive to creativity. Teachers’ creativity-fostering practices involved cognitive aspects, personal aspects, and classroom strategies. In addition, it was found that the personal factors which affected the teachers’ encouragement of creativity included, for example, relevant personality traits, intrinsic motivation, and positive attitudes toward fostering creativity. The environmental factors included influences from school and influences from parents and society. Study Two involved a survey of 399 teachers in Hong Kong primary schools. The sample involved teachers who were involved directly in activities related to gifted education in their schools (n = 187), and others who were not (n = 212). The regression analysis suggested that both creativity beliefs and a creative personality were direct predictors of the teachers’ creativity-fostering behaviors in the classroom. In addition, statistical analyses indicated that teachers who were involved directly in gifted education activities tended to score higher than mainstream teachers not so involved, on the variables of creativity beliefs, creative personality, and creativity-fostering behaviors. The differences were statistically significant, albeit small. A framework for teachers who foster creativity emerged from the findings, which suggested that teachers’ “Knowing,” “Being,” and “Doing” are important in their endeavors to enhance creativity, and that these aspects need to be situated within the appropriate contextual factors for it to be successful. Also, the small differences found between teachers involved directly in creativity and those who were not suggested that mainstream teachers may also have an adequate understanding of creativity. Therefore, contextual factors, such as exposure to creativity-related activities and experience in such programs, may be influential in teachers’ practices. This study addressed a research gap in the study of creativity by focusing on teachers involved in gifted education and by describing their beliefs and practices in creativity enhancement. The main implications of the study include the importance of teachers’ ongoing involvement in creativity-related activities, an appropriate classroom climate, and a supportive school environment in the promotion of creativity. The study findings are useful to educators and teachers, to inform them better about the nature of the relationship between teachers’ beliefs and their practices in fostering creativity.
DegreeDoctor of Education
SubjectGifted children - Education - China - Hong Kong
Primary school teachers - China - Hong Kong - Attitudes
Creative ability in children - Study and teaching (Primary) - China - Hong Kong
Dept/ProgramEducation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221047

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Serene-
dc.contributor.author陳穗寧-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-22T23:11:44Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-22T23:11:44Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationChan, S. [陳穗寧]. (2015). Fostering creativity : perceptions and practices of gifted education teachers. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5572977-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221047-
dc.description.abstractThis thesis investigated the beliefs about creativity and the creativity-fostering classroom practices that were held by Hong Kong primary teachers who were involved in gifted education. Other aspects that were examined included the personal and environmental factors that affected such practices, and the relationship between a creative personality, creativity beliefs, and creativity-fostering behaviors. Differences between teachers involved directly in gifted education and those who were not were also explored. A mixed-methods approach was employed involving two studies. Study One used in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 10 teachers who were trained in creativity and involved in gifted education activities in their schools. The interviews examined these teachers’ beliefs concerning creativity, their practices for creativity enhancement, and the factors influencing the use of such practices. It was possible to categorize the teachers’ beliefs in terms of the characteristics of a creative individual, the creative process, the creative product, the ultimate value of creativity, and environments that were conducive to creativity. Teachers’ creativity-fostering practices involved cognitive aspects, personal aspects, and classroom strategies. In addition, it was found that the personal factors which affected the teachers’ encouragement of creativity included, for example, relevant personality traits, intrinsic motivation, and positive attitudes toward fostering creativity. The environmental factors included influences from school and influences from parents and society. Study Two involved a survey of 399 teachers in Hong Kong primary schools. The sample involved teachers who were involved directly in activities related to gifted education in their schools (n = 187), and others who were not (n = 212). The regression analysis suggested that both creativity beliefs and a creative personality were direct predictors of the teachers’ creativity-fostering behaviors in the classroom. In addition, statistical analyses indicated that teachers who were involved directly in gifted education activities tended to score higher than mainstream teachers not so involved, on the variables of creativity beliefs, creative personality, and creativity-fostering behaviors. The differences were statistically significant, albeit small. A framework for teachers who foster creativity emerged from the findings, which suggested that teachers’ “Knowing,” “Being,” and “Doing” are important in their endeavors to enhance creativity, and that these aspects need to be situated within the appropriate contextual factors for it to be successful. Also, the small differences found between teachers involved directly in creativity and those who were not suggested that mainstream teachers may also have an adequate understanding of creativity. Therefore, contextual factors, such as exposure to creativity-related activities and experience in such programs, may be influential in teachers’ practices. This study addressed a research gap in the study of creativity by focusing on teachers involved in gifted education and by describing their beliefs and practices in creativity enhancement. The main implications of the study include the importance of teachers’ ongoing involvement in creativity-related activities, an appropriate classroom climate, and a supportive school environment in the promotion of creativity. The study findings are useful to educators and teachers, to inform them better about the nature of the relationship between teachers’ beliefs and their practices in fostering creativity.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshGifted children - Education - China - Hong Kong-
dc.subject.lcshPrimary school teachers - China - Hong Kong - Attitudes-
dc.subject.lcshCreative ability in children - Study and teaching (Primary) - China - Hong Kong-
dc.titleFostering creativity : perceptions and practices of gifted education teachers-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5572977-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Education-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEducation-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-

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