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postgraduate thesis: Impact of a play-based social skills programme for high-ability and average-ability primary one students in Hong Kong

TitleImpact of a play-based social skills programme for high-ability and average-ability primary one students in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Liu, S. S. [廖秀卿]. (2015). Impact of a play-based social skills programme for high-ability and average-ability primary one students in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5572978
AbstractSocial competence facilitates peer relationships and impacts upon all children’s personal growth and social fulfillment in life. However, there is a lack of impact studies evaluating school-wide intervention on young children’s social competence in Hong Kong. This research explored the impact of a social skills intervention programme on high- and average-ability Primary One students. Participants were 122 Primary One students (64 boys and 58 girls; age range: 5.67 to 6.57 years) newly enrolled in a Hong Kong primary school. The programme was implemented to enhance their social competence in order to ensure smooth adjustment after transition from different kindergartens to a formal school learning environment. The intervention involved 60 minutes of contact per week for eight weeks, and focused on playing interactive group games in the children’s own classrooms. The game activities were led by trained parent-volunteers. Two studies were carried out to evaluate, from multiple perspectives, the impact of the programme on the children’s social competence. The evaluation involved peers, trainers, parent-volunteers, parents and teachers. In Study One, peer nominations were used before and after intervention to assess participants’ sociometric status groupings (rejected, neglected, controversial, average and popular). Focus group interviews were also conducted with trainers who provided their viewpoints on the programme and their observations during the peer nomination process. Parent-volunteers observed children’s social behaviours and identified those who could not play cooperatively in group games. Improvement in children’s social awareness and peer status was noted post intervention. In addition, children’s competence in playing group games was positively correlated with their social acceptance levels. The interactive nature of playing group games was related to developing positive social behaviours. In Study Two, the impact of the programme was assessed through parent and teacher ratings of children’s social competence before and after intervention, and at the end of the academic year. High-ability students showed significant improvements in social competence, and this was sustained over time in both home and school settings. Average-ability students exhibited positive improvements in social competence in school, but this did not always transfer to home. In both studies, boys improved their social competence and narrowed the gender difference. Teachers’ ratings indicated that students in the programme made significantly greater progress than a comparison group of 136 Primary One students in another non-participating primary school. The positive outcomes also supported school-based interventions where children learn and apply strategies in authentic environments; social improvements were much more apparent in the school setting. This study supports that all young children could benefit from attending such school-wide social programmes, and confirms that high-ability children could improve their social competence significantly in an inclusive classroom without being withdrawn to join social skills training. One of the programme’s unique features is to involve parents for programme maintenance and continuity of training. This may help engender a long history of parent involvement, thus facilitating parent-teacher cooperation and home-school collaboration, leading to a longer-term impact. The early intervention is effective as a practical way to prepare young children for primary school life.
DegreeDoctor of Education
SubjectSocial skills - Study and teaching (Primary) - China - Hong Kong
Dept/ProgramEducation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221005

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Sau-hing, Sylvia-
dc.contributor.author廖秀卿-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-22T23:11:37Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-22T23:11:37Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationLiu, S. S. [廖秀卿]. (2015). Impact of a play-based social skills programme for high-ability and average-ability primary one students in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5572978-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221005-
dc.description.abstractSocial competence facilitates peer relationships and impacts upon all children’s personal growth and social fulfillment in life. However, there is a lack of impact studies evaluating school-wide intervention on young children’s social competence in Hong Kong. This research explored the impact of a social skills intervention programme on high- and average-ability Primary One students. Participants were 122 Primary One students (64 boys and 58 girls; age range: 5.67 to 6.57 years) newly enrolled in a Hong Kong primary school. The programme was implemented to enhance their social competence in order to ensure smooth adjustment after transition from different kindergartens to a formal school learning environment. The intervention involved 60 minutes of contact per week for eight weeks, and focused on playing interactive group games in the children’s own classrooms. The game activities were led by trained parent-volunteers. Two studies were carried out to evaluate, from multiple perspectives, the impact of the programme on the children’s social competence. The evaluation involved peers, trainers, parent-volunteers, parents and teachers. In Study One, peer nominations were used before and after intervention to assess participants’ sociometric status groupings (rejected, neglected, controversial, average and popular). Focus group interviews were also conducted with trainers who provided their viewpoints on the programme and their observations during the peer nomination process. Parent-volunteers observed children’s social behaviours and identified those who could not play cooperatively in group games. Improvement in children’s social awareness and peer status was noted post intervention. In addition, children’s competence in playing group games was positively correlated with their social acceptance levels. The interactive nature of playing group games was related to developing positive social behaviours. In Study Two, the impact of the programme was assessed through parent and teacher ratings of children’s social competence before and after intervention, and at the end of the academic year. High-ability students showed significant improvements in social competence, and this was sustained over time in both home and school settings. Average-ability students exhibited positive improvements in social competence in school, but this did not always transfer to home. In both studies, boys improved their social competence and narrowed the gender difference. Teachers’ ratings indicated that students in the programme made significantly greater progress than a comparison group of 136 Primary One students in another non-participating primary school. The positive outcomes also supported school-based interventions where children learn and apply strategies in authentic environments; social improvements were much more apparent in the school setting. This study supports that all young children could benefit from attending such school-wide social programmes, and confirms that high-ability children could improve their social competence significantly in an inclusive classroom without being withdrawn to join social skills training. One of the programme’s unique features is to involve parents for programme maintenance and continuity of training. This may help engender a long history of parent involvement, thus facilitating parent-teacher cooperation and home-school collaboration, leading to a longer-term impact. The early intervention is effective as a practical way to prepare young children for primary school life.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshSocial skills - Study and teaching (Primary) - China - Hong Kong-
dc.titleImpact of a play-based social skills programme for high-ability and average-ability primary one students in Hong Kong-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5572978-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Education-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEducation-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-

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