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Article: Refining the continuous tracking paradigm to investigate implicit motor learning

TitleRefining the continuous tracking paradigm to investigate implicit motor learning
Authors
KeywordsContinuous tracking task
Complexity control
Time-on-task effect
Implicit learning
Issue Date2014
Citation
Experimental Psychology, 2014, v. 61, n. 3, p. 196-204 How to Cite?
AbstractIn two experiments we investigated factors that undermine conclusions about implicit motor learning in the continuous tracking paradigm. In Experiment 1, we constructed a practice phase in which all three segments of the waveform pattern were random, in order to examine whether tracking performance decreased as a consequence of time spent on task. Tracking error was lower in the first segment than in the middle segment and lower in the middle segment than in the final segment, indicating that tracking performance decreased as a function of increasing time-on-task. In Experiment 2, the waveform pattern presented in the middle segment was identical in each trial of practice. In a retention test, tracking performance on the repeated segment was superior to tracking performance on the random segments of the waveform. Furthermore, substitution of the repeated pattern with a random pattern (in a transfer test) resulted in a significantly increased tracking error. These findings imply that characteristics of the repeated pattern were learned. Crucially, tests of pattern recognition implied that participants were not explicitly aware of the presence of a recurring segment of waveform. Recommendations for refining the continuous tracking paradigm for implicit learning research are proposed. © 2013 Hogrefe Publishing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220892
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.166
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhu, F. F.-
dc.contributor.authorPoolton, J. M.-
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, J. P.-
dc.contributor.authorFan, J. K M-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, G. K K-
dc.contributor.authorMasters, R. S W-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-22T09:04:43Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-22T09:04:43Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationExperimental Psychology, 2014, v. 61, n. 3, p. 196-204-
dc.identifier.issn1618-3169-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220892-
dc.description.abstractIn two experiments we investigated factors that undermine conclusions about implicit motor learning in the continuous tracking paradigm. In Experiment 1, we constructed a practice phase in which all three segments of the waveform pattern were random, in order to examine whether tracking performance decreased as a consequence of time spent on task. Tracking error was lower in the first segment than in the middle segment and lower in the middle segment than in the final segment, indicating that tracking performance decreased as a function of increasing time-on-task. In Experiment 2, the waveform pattern presented in the middle segment was identical in each trial of practice. In a retention test, tracking performance on the repeated segment was superior to tracking performance on the random segments of the waveform. Furthermore, substitution of the repeated pattern with a random pattern (in a transfer test) resulted in a significantly increased tracking error. These findings imply that characteristics of the repeated pattern were learned. Crucially, tests of pattern recognition implied that participants were not explicitly aware of the presence of a recurring segment of waveform. Recommendations for refining the continuous tracking paradigm for implicit learning research are proposed. © 2013 Hogrefe Publishing.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofExperimental Psychology-
dc.subjectContinuous tracking task-
dc.subjectComplexity control-
dc.subjectTime-on-task effect-
dc.subjectImplicit learning-
dc.titleRefining the continuous tracking paradigm to investigate implicit motor learning-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1027/1618-3169/a000239-
dc.identifier.pmid24149243-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84899684118-
dc.identifier.hkuros221046-
dc.identifier.volume61-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage196-
dc.identifier.epage204-
dc.identifier.eissn2190-5142-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000335515700004-

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