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Article: Pathogenesis Of Colonization And Infection In A Neonatal Surgical Unit

TitlePathogenesis Of Colonization And Infection In A Neonatal Surgical Unit
Authors
Issue Date1990
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ccmjournal.org
Citation
Critical Care Medicine, 1990, v. 18 n. 3, p. 264-269 How to Cite?
AbstractNosocomial Infection With Aerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli Is A Major Cause Of Morbidity And Mortality In Neonates. Few Prospective Studies Have Been Undertaken In Neonatal Surgical Units To Investigate Colonization And Infection Rates And The Pathogenesis Of Infection. We Prospectively Studied 40 Infants Admitted To A Neonatal Surgical Unit. Ninety-Eight Percent Became Colonized In Throat/Intestine With Aerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli. Thirty-Five Percent Developed Infections, With Wound And Surface Infections Predominant (61%). Ninety-One Percent Of Infections Were Caused By Gram-Negative Bacilli Or Yeasts. Severe Infections (Septicemia, Pneumonia, Meningitis) Occurred In 13% Of Infants. The Mortality Rate Was 5%. In All Infections, The Pathogenesis Was Found To Be Endogenous, And In Most, Three Stages Were Distinguishable. Neonates Always Acquired Potentially Pathogenic Organisms In Throat/Intestine (Stage 1) Before Colonization (Stage 2) And Infection (Stage 3) Of Other Systems Occurred. Reduction Of Digestive Tract Colonization By These Potentially Pathogenic Microorganisms By Means Of Successful Selective Decontamination May Therefore Reduce Subsequent Infection.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220809
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.422
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.748
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeonard, EMen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Saene, HKFen_US
dc.contributor.authorShears, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorTam, PKHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-19T04:05:13Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-19T04:05:13Z-
dc.date.issued1990-
dc.identifier.citationCritical Care Medicine, 1990, v. 18 n. 3, p. 264-269en_US
dc.identifier.issn0090-3493-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220809-
dc.description.abstractNosocomial Infection With Aerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli Is A Major Cause Of Morbidity And Mortality In Neonates. Few Prospective Studies Have Been Undertaken In Neonatal Surgical Units To Investigate Colonization And Infection Rates And The Pathogenesis Of Infection. We Prospectively Studied 40 Infants Admitted To A Neonatal Surgical Unit. Ninety-Eight Percent Became Colonized In Throat/Intestine With Aerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli. Thirty-Five Percent Developed Infections, With Wound And Surface Infections Predominant (61%). Ninety-One Percent Of Infections Were Caused By Gram-Negative Bacilli Or Yeasts. Severe Infections (Septicemia, Pneumonia, Meningitis) Occurred In 13% Of Infants. The Mortality Rate Was 5%. In All Infections, The Pathogenesis Was Found To Be Endogenous, And In Most, Three Stages Were Distinguishable. Neonates Always Acquired Potentially Pathogenic Organisms In Throat/Intestine (Stage 1) Before Colonization (Stage 2) And Infection (Stage 3) Of Other Systems Occurred. Reduction Of Digestive Tract Colonization By These Potentially Pathogenic Microorganisms By Means Of Successful Selective Decontamination May Therefore Reduce Subsequent Infection.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ccmjournal.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCritical Care Medicineen_US
dc.titlePathogenesis Of Colonization And Infection In A Neonatal Surgical Uniten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTam, PKH:paultam@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTam, PKH=rp00060-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2302949-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0025215377-
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage264-
dc.identifier.epage269-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1990CR49100003-

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