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Article: Delayed Primary Wound Closure Using Skin Tapes For Advanced Appendicitis In Children: A Prospective, Controlled Study

TitleDelayed Primary Wound Closure Using Skin Tapes For Advanced Appendicitis In Children: A Prospective, Controlled Study
Authors
Issue Date1992
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archsurg.com
Citation
Archives Of Surgery, 1992, v. 127 n. 4, p. 451-453 How to Cite?
AbstractIn A 3-Year Period, 63 Consecutive Patients With Advanced Perforated (N = 53) And Gangrenous (N = 10) Appendicitis Were Allocated To Undergo Either Immediate Wound Closure Or Delayed Primary Wound Closure After Emergency Appendectomy. The Incidence Of Wound Infection Between Delayed Primary Wound Closure And Immediate Wound Closure Was Similar (24.0% And 21.1%, Respectively). The Duration For Complete Healing Of Infected Wounds Was Slightly Shorter In The Group Undergoing Delayed Primary Wound Closure (Mean±Sd, 24.3±9.2 Days) Than In The Group Undergoing Immediate Wound Closure (Mean±Sd, 32.6±16.5 Days), But The Difference Was Not Significant. However, Healing Of Noninfected Wounds Was Significantly Prolonged In The Group Undergoing Delayed Primary Wound Closure (Mean±Sd, 19.3±10.1 Days) Compared With The Group Undergoing Immediate Wound Closure (Mean±Sd, 7.0±0 Days). The Latter Had Been Shown To Associate With More Nonseptic Wound Complications And Therefore Required Longer Rehabilitation. Our Study Showed That Delayed Primary Closure Did Not Offer Additional Advantage Over Immediate Closure In The Treatment Of Wounds Associated With Advanced Appendicitis In Children.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220794
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 4.926
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsang, TMen_US
dc.contributor.authorTam, PKHen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaing, Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-19T03:48:22Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-19T03:48:22Z-
dc.date.issued1992-
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Surgery, 1992, v. 127 n. 4, p. 451-453en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-0010-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220794-
dc.description.abstractIn A 3-Year Period, 63 Consecutive Patients With Advanced Perforated (N = 53) And Gangrenous (N = 10) Appendicitis Were Allocated To Undergo Either Immediate Wound Closure Or Delayed Primary Wound Closure After Emergency Appendectomy. The Incidence Of Wound Infection Between Delayed Primary Wound Closure And Immediate Wound Closure Was Similar (24.0% And 21.1%, Respectively). The Duration For Complete Healing Of Infected Wounds Was Slightly Shorter In The Group Undergoing Delayed Primary Wound Closure (Mean±Sd, 24.3±9.2 Days) Than In The Group Undergoing Immediate Wound Closure (Mean±Sd, 32.6±16.5 Days), But The Difference Was Not Significant. However, Healing Of Noninfected Wounds Was Significantly Prolonged In The Group Undergoing Delayed Primary Wound Closure (Mean±Sd, 19.3±10.1 Days) Compared With The Group Undergoing Immediate Wound Closure (Mean±Sd, 7.0±0 Days). The Latter Had Been Shown To Associate With More Nonseptic Wound Complications And Therefore Required Longer Rehabilitation. Our Study Showed That Delayed Primary Closure Did Not Offer Additional Advantage Over Immediate Closure In The Treatment Of Wounds Associated With Advanced Appendicitis In Children.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archsurg.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchives Of Surgeryen_US
dc.titleDelayed Primary Wound Closure Using Skin Tapes For Advanced Appendicitis In Children: A Prospective, Controlled Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTam, PKH:paultam@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTam, PKH=rp00060-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid1558500-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0026535968-
dc.identifier.volume127-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage451-
dc.identifier.epage453-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1992HM46400016-

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