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Article: Thoracoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia: two centres’ experience with 60 patients

TitleThoracoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia: two centres’ experience with 60 patients
Authors
KeywordsInfants
Minimal invasive surgery
Thoracoscopy
Congenital diaphragmatic hernia
Issue Date2014
Citation
Pediatric Surgery International, 2014, v. 31, n. 2, p. 191-195 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Methods: All patients who underwent thoracoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia between 2010 and 2013 at the two tertiary referral centres were identified. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Data including patients’ demographics, peri-operative outcomes, length of hospitalisation and post-operative complications were extracted and analysed. Introduction: Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a potentially life-threatening neonatal condition which required surgical intervention. With the advances in endosurgical instruments and techniques, thoracoscopic approach is gaining popularity as a standard procedure in the treatment of this condition. In this study, we reviewed our two centres’ experience with thoracoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in recent years. Conclusion: Thoracoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia can be performed safely in specialised centres. The post-operative recovery and cosmesis are excellent. Diaphragmatic hernia with large defect remains a challenge for surgeons. Results: 60 patients were identified over the study period, with 46 males and 14 females. 48 patients received operation within the first 7 days of life. There were seven patients with delayed presentation and were operated after 1 month old. The average body weight was 3.03 kg. Left-sided hernia was more prevalent (n = 50). The mean operative time was 88.5 min (range 31–194 min). No conversion to open thoracotomy or laparotomy was required in any of the patients. All patients except one were intubated and paralysed in neonatal intensive care units for at least 3 days after operation. Average hospital stay was 14.6 days. There was no mortality in this series. There were five recurrences, one being the patient without post-operative paralysis, and the others with deficient posterior muscle rim. No musculoskeletal deformity was noted on follow-up examination.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220763
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.01
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.409

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHuang, J. S.-
dc.contributor.authorLau, C. T.-
dc.contributor.authorWong, W. Y.-
dc.contributor.authorTao, Q.-
dc.contributor.authorWong, Kenneth K Y-
dc.contributor.authorTam, P. K H-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-16T06:50:28Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-16T06:50:28Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Surgery International, 2014, v. 31, n. 2, p. 191-195-
dc.identifier.issn0179-0358-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220763-
dc.description.abstract© 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Methods: All patients who underwent thoracoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia between 2010 and 2013 at the two tertiary referral centres were identified. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Data including patients’ demographics, peri-operative outcomes, length of hospitalisation and post-operative complications were extracted and analysed. Introduction: Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a potentially life-threatening neonatal condition which required surgical intervention. With the advances in endosurgical instruments and techniques, thoracoscopic approach is gaining popularity as a standard procedure in the treatment of this condition. In this study, we reviewed our two centres’ experience with thoracoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in recent years. Conclusion: Thoracoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia can be performed safely in specialised centres. The post-operative recovery and cosmesis are excellent. Diaphragmatic hernia with large defect remains a challenge for surgeons. Results: 60 patients were identified over the study period, with 46 males and 14 females. 48 patients received operation within the first 7 days of life. There were seven patients with delayed presentation and were operated after 1 month old. The average body weight was 3.03 kg. Left-sided hernia was more prevalent (n = 50). The mean operative time was 88.5 min (range 31–194 min). No conversion to open thoracotomy or laparotomy was required in any of the patients. All patients except one were intubated and paralysed in neonatal intensive care units for at least 3 days after operation. Average hospital stay was 14.6 days. There was no mortality in this series. There were five recurrences, one being the patient without post-operative paralysis, and the others with deficient posterior muscle rim. No musculoskeletal deformity was noted on follow-up examination.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Surgery International-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00383-014-3645-0-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectInfants-
dc.subjectMinimal invasive surgery-
dc.subjectThoracoscopy-
dc.subjectCongenital diaphragmatic hernia-
dc.titleThoracoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia: two centres’ experience with 60 patients-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00383-014-3645-0-
dc.identifier.pmid25430524-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84922104731-
dc.identifier.hkuros242448-
dc.identifier.volume31-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage191-
dc.identifier.epage195-
dc.identifier.eissn1437-9813-

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