File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

Supplementary

Conference Paper: Distraction failure in magnetically-controlled growing rods: prevalence and risk factors

TitleDistraction failure in magnetically-controlled growing rods: prevalence and risk factors
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherSICOT.
Citation
36th SICOT Orthopaedic World Congress, Guangzhou, China, 17-19 September 2015 How to Cite?
AbstractINTRODUCTION: Recently, the use of 'magnetically' controlled growing rods (MCGR) has advanced the surgical treatment of early onset scoliosis (EOS), providing non-invasive distractions. Occassionally the rod may fail to distract due to slippage of the internal mechanism. This study assessed the occurrence and potential determinants associated with slippage of the MCGR during distraction. METHODS: We prospectively assessed 4 EOS patients with implantation of dual MCGR. Each underwent monthly outpatient distractions. Rod slippage was noted if a 'clunking' noise occurred during distraction. Rradiographic parameters and demographics were analysed. RESULTS: The mean time period from operation to the first slippage was 11 months. Overall, in 168 distraction episodes, slippage was noted in 25%. Offset rod (35%) had more slippage compared to the standard rod (17%). Early slippage (within one year of surgery) occurred in 50% of the patients. Based on the sample size, demographics, number of vertebral levels involved, distance between magnets, and curve alignment/flexibility parameters were not distinctively involved in rod slippage. Despite this slippage, there was overall gain in the implant and the spine. Throughout follow-up, all patients had no pain, had good functional outcome, and were satisfied with the procedure. CONCLUSION: In MCGR patients, rod slippage can occur within the first year since implantation and may continue thereafter. This is the first study to identify this observation. Larger studies are needed to further validate our findings and determine if such an event is a potential complication or a naturally occurring, physiological fail-safe mechanism that benefits the patient.
DescriptionPoster presentation: Abstract No.: 40275
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220676

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, D-
dc.contributor.authorTan, BB-
dc.contributor.authorBow, CHY-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, JPY-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMC-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-16T06:49:18Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-16T06:49:18Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citation36th SICOT Orthopaedic World Congress, Guangzhou, China, 17-19 September 2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220676-
dc.descriptionPoster presentation: Abstract No.: 40275-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Recently, the use of 'magnetically' controlled growing rods (MCGR) has advanced the surgical treatment of early onset scoliosis (EOS), providing non-invasive distractions. Occassionally the rod may fail to distract due to slippage of the internal mechanism. This study assessed the occurrence and potential determinants associated with slippage of the MCGR during distraction. METHODS: We prospectively assessed 4 EOS patients with implantation of dual MCGR. Each underwent monthly outpatient distractions. Rod slippage was noted if a 'clunking' noise occurred during distraction. Rradiographic parameters and demographics were analysed. RESULTS: The mean time period from operation to the first slippage was 11 months. Overall, in 168 distraction episodes, slippage was noted in 25%. Offset rod (35%) had more slippage compared to the standard rod (17%). Early slippage (within one year of surgery) occurred in 50% of the patients. Based on the sample size, demographics, number of vertebral levels involved, distance between magnets, and curve alignment/flexibility parameters were not distinctively involved in rod slippage. Despite this slippage, there was overall gain in the implant and the spine. Throughout follow-up, all patients had no pain, had good functional outcome, and were satisfied with the procedure. CONCLUSION: In MCGR patients, rod slippage can occur within the first year since implantation and may continue thereafter. This is the first study to identify this observation. Larger studies are needed to further validate our findings and determine if such an event is a potential complication or a naturally occurring, physiological fail-safe mechanism that benefits the patient.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSICOT. -
dc.relation.ispartofSICOT Orthopaedic World Congress-
dc.titleDistraction failure in magnetically-controlled growing rods: prevalence and risk factors-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D: dspine@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailBow, CHY: cbow@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, JPY: cheungjp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC: cheungmc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, JPY=rp01685-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387-
dc.identifier.hkuros255898-
dc.publisher.placeGuangzhou, China-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats