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Book Chapter: A Multi-case Investigation into Trilingualism and Trilingual Education in Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture

TitleA Multi-case Investigation into Trilingualism and Trilingual Education in Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherSpringer
Citation
A Multi-case Investigation into Trilingualism and Trilingual Education in Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture. In Anwei Feng & Bob Adamson (Eds.), Trilingualism in education in China: Models and challenges, p. 141-171. Dordrecht: Springer, 2015 How to Cite?
AbstractAmong the 55 officially recognised ethnic minority groups in China, the Yi are the seventh largest, with a population of about 7.7 million, unevenly distributed across the mountainous regions of southwest China, primarily in three provinces, Yunnan, Sichuan and Guizhou. This chapter focuses on the Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture, home to speakers of Nuosu. Nuosu is not an endangered language but it is becoming vulnerable because of the power of Chinese and changes to the demographic makeup of society. The chapter uses an educational linguistic approach to investigate trilingualism and trilingual education in Liangshan. It finds that, in common with many other ethnic minority languages in China, the maintenance of Nuosu is hindered by historical, political and sociolinguistic factors, and suggests a number of measures to improve the situation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220538
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, C-
dc.contributor.authorDing, H-
dc.contributor.authorWong, H-
dc.contributor.authorYu, L-
dc.contributor.authorYang, M-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-16T06:44:50Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-16T06:44:50Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationA Multi-case Investigation into Trilingualism and Trilingual Education in Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture. In Anwei Feng & Bob Adamson (Eds.), Trilingualism in education in China: Models and challenges, p. 141-171. Dordrecht: Springer, 2015-
dc.identifier.isbn9789401793513-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220538-
dc.description.abstractAmong the 55 officially recognised ethnic minority groups in China, the Yi are the seventh largest, with a population of about 7.7 million, unevenly distributed across the mountainous regions of southwest China, primarily in three provinces, Yunnan, Sichuan and Guizhou. This chapter focuses on the Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture, home to speakers of Nuosu. Nuosu is not an endangered language but it is becoming vulnerable because of the power of Chinese and changes to the demographic makeup of society. The chapter uses an educational linguistic approach to investigate trilingualism and trilingual education in Liangshan. It finds that, in common with many other ethnic minority languages in China, the maintenance of Nuosu is hindered by historical, political and sociolinguistic factors, and suggests a number of measures to improve the situation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer-
dc.relation.ispartofTrilingualism in education in China: Models and challenges-
dc.titleA Multi-case Investigation into Trilingualism and Trilingual Education in Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-94-017-9352-0_7-
dc.identifier.hkuros255139-
dc.identifier.spage141-
dc.identifier.epage171-
dc.publisher.placeDordrecht-

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