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Article: A Dose-Response Curve Describing the Relationship Between Urban Tree Cover Density and Self-Reported Stress Recovery

TitleA Dose-Response Curve Describing the Relationship Between Urban Tree Cover Density and Self-Reported Stress Recovery
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Environment and Behavior, 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough it is well established that viewing nature can help individuals recover from a stressful experience, the dose-response curve describing the relationship between tree cover density and stress recovery is totally unclear. A total of 160 participants engaged in a standard Trier Social Stress Test to induce stress. Participants were then randomly assigned to watch 1 of 10 three-dimensional videos of street scenes that varied in the density of tree cover (from 2% to 62%). Participants completed a Visual Analog Scale questionnaire at three points in the experiment. Analysis revealed a positive, linear association between the density of urban street trees and self-reported stress recovery, adjusted R 2 = .05, F(1, 149) = 8.53, p < .01. This relationship holds after controlling for gender, age, and baseline stress levels. A content analysis of participants’ written narratives revealed a similar but even stronger association. These findings suggest that viewing tree canopy in communities can significantly aid stress recovery and that every tree matters.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220105

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJiang, B-
dc.contributor.authorLi, DY-
dc.contributor.authorLarsen, L-
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, WC-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-16T06:29:12Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-16T06:29:12Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironment and Behavior, 2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220105-
dc.description.abstractAlthough it is well established that viewing nature can help individuals recover from a stressful experience, the dose-response curve describing the relationship between tree cover density and stress recovery is totally unclear. A total of 160 participants engaged in a standard Trier Social Stress Test to induce stress. Participants were then randomly assigned to watch 1 of 10 three-dimensional videos of street scenes that varied in the density of tree cover (from 2% to 62%). Participants completed a Visual Analog Scale questionnaire at three points in the experiment. Analysis revealed a positive, linear association between the density of urban street trees and self-reported stress recovery, adjusted R 2 = .05, F(1, 149) = 8.53, p < .01. This relationship holds after controlling for gender, age, and baseline stress levels. A content analysis of participants’ written narratives revealed a similar but even stronger association. These findings suggest that viewing tree canopy in communities can significantly aid stress recovery and that every tree matters.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironment and Behavior-
dc.titleA Dose-Response Curve Describing the Relationship Between Urban Tree Cover Density and Self-Reported Stress Recovery-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailJiang, B: jiangbin@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityJiang, B=rp01942-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0013916514552321-
dc.identifier.hkuros255338-

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