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Article: Cognitive and limbic effects of deep brain stimulation in preclinical studies

TitleCognitive and limbic effects of deep brain stimulation in preclinical studies
Authors
KeywordsSerotonin
Huntington's disease
Forced swim task
Neurological
Nucleus accumbens
Obsessive-compulsive disorder
Panic
Parkinson's disease
Psychiatric
Review
Subthalamic nucleus
Animal models
Depression
Deep brain stimulation
Basal ganglia
Issue Date2009
Citation
Frontiers in Bioscience, 2009, v. 14, n. 5, p. 1891-1901 How to Cite?
AbstractThe use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to control severely disabling neurological and psychiatric conditions is an exciting and fast emerging area of neuroscience. Deep brain stimulation has generally the same clinical effects as a lesion with respect to the improvement of clinical disability, but has more advantages such as its adjustability and reversibility. To this day, fundamental knowledge regarding the application of electrical currents to deep brain structures is far from complete. Despite improving key symptoms in movement disorders, DBS can be associated with the occurrence of a variety of changes in cognitive and limbic functions both in humans and animals. Furthermore, in psychiatric disorders, DBS is primarily used to evoke cognitive and limbic changes to reduce the psychiatric disability. Preclinical DBS experiments have been carried out to investigate the mechanisms underlying the clinical effects of DBS for at least three (interrelated) reasons: to increase our scientific knowledge, to optimize/refine the technology, or to prevent/reduce side-effects. In this review, we will discuss the limbic and cognitive effects of DBS in preclinical studies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219855
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.484
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.583

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTemel, Yasin-
dc.contributor.authorTan, Sonny-
dc.contributor.authorVlamings, Rinske-
dc.contributor.authorSesia, Thibaut-
dc.contributor.authorLim, Lee Wei-
dc.contributor.authorLardeux, Sylvie-
dc.contributor.authorVisser-Vandewalle, Veerle-
dc.contributor.authorBaunez, Christelle-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-24T04:44:06Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-24T04:44:06Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Bioscience, 2009, v. 14, n. 5, p. 1891-1901-
dc.identifier.issn1093-9946-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219855-
dc.description.abstractThe use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to control severely disabling neurological and psychiatric conditions is an exciting and fast emerging area of neuroscience. Deep brain stimulation has generally the same clinical effects as a lesion with respect to the improvement of clinical disability, but has more advantages such as its adjustability and reversibility. To this day, fundamental knowledge regarding the application of electrical currents to deep brain structures is far from complete. Despite improving key symptoms in movement disorders, DBS can be associated with the occurrence of a variety of changes in cognitive and limbic functions both in humans and animals. Furthermore, in psychiatric disorders, DBS is primarily used to evoke cognitive and limbic changes to reduce the psychiatric disability. Preclinical DBS experiments have been carried out to investigate the mechanisms underlying the clinical effects of DBS for at least three (interrelated) reasons: to increase our scientific knowledge, to optimize/refine the technology, or to prevent/reduce side-effects. In this review, we will discuss the limbic and cognitive effects of DBS in preclinical studies.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Bioscience-
dc.subjectSerotonin-
dc.subjectHuntington's disease-
dc.subjectForced swim task-
dc.subjectNeurological-
dc.subjectNucleus accumbens-
dc.subjectObsessive-compulsive disorder-
dc.subjectPanic-
dc.subjectParkinson's disease-
dc.subjectPsychiatric-
dc.subjectReview-
dc.subjectSubthalamic nucleus-
dc.subjectAnimal models-
dc.subjectDepression-
dc.subjectDeep brain stimulation-
dc.subjectBasal ganglia-
dc.titleCognitive and limbic effects of deep brain stimulation in preclinical studies-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.2741/3349-
dc.identifier.pmid19273171-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-63849126045-
dc.identifier.volume14-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage1891-
dc.identifier.epage1901-

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