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Article: What regulates crab predation on mangrove propagules?

TitleWhat regulates crab predation on mangrove propagules?
Authors
KeywordsPropagule
Competition
Decapod
Gazi Bay
Predation
Issue Date2015
Citation
Acta Oecologica, 2015, v. 63, p. 63-70 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. Crabs play a major role in some ecosystems. To increase our knowledge about the factors that influence crab predation on propagules in mangrove forests, we performed experiments in Gazi Bay, Kenya in July 2009. We tested whether: (1) crab density influences propagule predation rate; (2) crab size influences food competition and predation rate; (3) crabs depredate at different rates according to propagule and canopy cover species; (4) vegetation density is correlated with crab density; (5) food preferences of herbivorous crabs are determined by size, shape and nutritional value. We found that (1) propagule predation rate was positively correlated to crab density. (2) Crab competitive abilities were unrelated to their size. (3) Avicennia marina propagules were consumed more quickly than Ceriops tagal except under C.tagal canopies. (4) Crab density was negatively correlated with the density of A. marina trees and pneumatophores. (5) Crabs prefer small items with a lower C:N ratio.Vegetation density influences crab density, and crab density affects propagule availability and hence vegetation recruitment rate. Consequently, the mutual relationships between vegetation and crab populations could be important for forest restoration success and management.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219776
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.42
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.915

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVan Nedervelde, Fleur-
dc.contributor.authorCannicci, Stefano-
dc.contributor.authorKoedam, Nico-
dc.contributor.authorBosire, Jared-
dc.contributor.authorDahdouh-Guebas, Farid-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-23T02:57:56Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-23T02:57:56Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationActa Oecologica, 2015, v. 63, p. 63-70-
dc.identifier.issn1146-609X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219776-
dc.description.abstract© 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. Crabs play a major role in some ecosystems. To increase our knowledge about the factors that influence crab predation on propagules in mangrove forests, we performed experiments in Gazi Bay, Kenya in July 2009. We tested whether: (1) crab density influences propagule predation rate; (2) crab size influences food competition and predation rate; (3) crabs depredate at different rates according to propagule and canopy cover species; (4) vegetation density is correlated with crab density; (5) food preferences of herbivorous crabs are determined by size, shape and nutritional value. We found that (1) propagule predation rate was positively correlated to crab density. (2) Crab competitive abilities were unrelated to their size. (3) Avicennia marina propagules were consumed more quickly than Ceriops tagal except under C.tagal canopies. (4) Crab density was negatively correlated with the density of A. marina trees and pneumatophores. (5) Crabs prefer small items with a lower C:N ratio.Vegetation density influences crab density, and crab density affects propagule availability and hence vegetation recruitment rate. Consequently, the mutual relationships between vegetation and crab populations could be important for forest restoration success and management.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofActa Oecologica-
dc.subjectPropagule-
dc.subjectCompetition-
dc.subjectDecapod-
dc.subjectGazi Bay-
dc.subjectPredation-
dc.titleWhat regulates crab predation on mangrove propagules?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.actao.2014.11.006-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84923334816-
dc.identifier.volume63-
dc.identifier.spage63-
dc.identifier.epage70-

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