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Article: The Politics of the Minimum Wage in Hong Kong

TitleThe Politics of the Minimum Wage in Hong Kong
Authors
Keywordssemi-democracy
business-state relationship
Hong Kong
Welfare state
labour movement
minimum wage
Singapore
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of Contemporary Asia, 2014, v. 44 n. 4, p. 735-752 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article provides an account of the recent introduction of a minimum wage in Hong Kong in 2011. Traditional welfare state theories had their origins in rich democracies. We refine the theoretical arguments in accordance with the semi-democratic nature of Hong Kong. We argue that the legislation was initiated reluctantly by the business-friendly government under unfavourable economic conditions. Any subsequent concessions to labour were not attributable to labour strength or political oppositions, which were very weak. Instead, multiple miscalculations by the politically dominant business side allowed the labour movement to gain limited grounds throughout the struggle. We also apply our arguments to the case of Singapore, illustrating how welfare state theories can be adapted to less democratic systems. © 2014 © 2014 Journal of Contemporary Asia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219747
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.844
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.708

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Mathew Y H-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-23T02:57:52Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-23T02:57:52Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Contemporary Asia, 2014, v. 44 n. 4, p. 735-752-
dc.identifier.issn0047-2336-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219747-
dc.description.abstractThis article provides an account of the recent introduction of a minimum wage in Hong Kong in 2011. Traditional welfare state theories had their origins in rich democracies. We refine the theoretical arguments in accordance with the semi-democratic nature of Hong Kong. We argue that the legislation was initiated reluctantly by the business-friendly government under unfavourable economic conditions. Any subsequent concessions to labour were not attributable to labour strength or political oppositions, which were very weak. Instead, multiple miscalculations by the politically dominant business side allowed the labour movement to gain limited grounds throughout the struggle. We also apply our arguments to the case of Singapore, illustrating how welfare state theories can be adapted to less democratic systems. © 2014 © 2014 Journal of Contemporary Asia.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Contemporary Asia-
dc.subjectsemi-democracy-
dc.subjectbusiness-state relationship-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectWelfare state-
dc.subjectlabour movement-
dc.subjectminimum wage-
dc.subjectSingapore-
dc.titleThe Politics of the Minimum Wage in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00472336.2014.906641-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84899469606-
dc.identifier.hkuros253432-
dc.identifier.eissn1752-7554-

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