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Article: Not so super: The ontology of 'supervernaculars'

TitleNot so super: The ontology of 'supervernaculars'
Authors
KeywordsSupervernaculars
Roy Harris
Ontology of language
Fixed-code semantics
Digital literacy practices
Issue Date2012
Citation
Language and Communication, 2012, v. 32, n. 4, p. 349-357 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article offers a critical response to Blommaert's notion of 'supervernaculars'. The discussion focuses on the tenability of the ontological assumptions which underlie its introduction. It is argued that despite the superficial terminological innovation, the concept of 'supervernaculars' rests on a quite orthodox ontology of language and communication, that is to say one which posits abstract artefactual entities existing over and above individual communicational situations and affirms a code-based view of language. Consequently, the category of the 'supervernacular' fails to provide a satisfactory theoretical framework with which to describe the types of 'mixed' language use frequently encountered in certain modern communicative practices. A more coherent and indeed prosaic account of such practices can instead be had by arguing on the basis of a Harrisian critique of orthodox linguistics. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219683
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.366
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.633

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOrman, Jon-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-23T02:57:43Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-23T02:57:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationLanguage and Communication, 2012, v. 32, n. 4, p. 349-357-
dc.identifier.issn0271-5309-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219683-
dc.description.abstractThis article offers a critical response to Blommaert's notion of 'supervernaculars'. The discussion focuses on the tenability of the ontological assumptions which underlie its introduction. It is argued that despite the superficial terminological innovation, the concept of 'supervernaculars' rests on a quite orthodox ontology of language and communication, that is to say one which posits abstract artefactual entities existing over and above individual communicational situations and affirms a code-based view of language. Consequently, the category of the 'supervernacular' fails to provide a satisfactory theoretical framework with which to describe the types of 'mixed' language use frequently encountered in certain modern communicative practices. A more coherent and indeed prosaic account of such practices can instead be had by arguing on the basis of a Harrisian critique of orthodox linguistics. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofLanguage and Communication-
dc.subjectSupervernaculars-
dc.subjectRoy Harris-
dc.subjectOntology of language-
dc.subjectFixed-code semantics-
dc.subjectDigital literacy practices-
dc.titleNot so super: The ontology of 'supervernaculars'-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.langcom.2012.08.001-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84870248847-
dc.identifier.volume32-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage349-
dc.identifier.epage357-

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