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Article: Cultural health assets of Somali and Oromo refugees and immigrants in Minnesota: Findings from a community-based participatory research project

TitleCultural health assets of Somali and Oromo refugees and immigrants in Minnesota: Findings from a community-based participatory research project
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherThe Johns Hopkins University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_health_care_for_the_poor_and_underserved/index.html
Citation
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 2016, v. 27 n. 1, p. 252-260 How to Cite?
AbstractThis community-based participatory research study sought to identify the cultural health assets of the Somali and Oromo communities in one Minnesota neighborhood that could be mobilized to develop culturally appropriate health interventions. Community asset mappers conducted 76 interviews with Somali and Oromo refugees in in Minnesota regarding the cultural assets of their community. A community-university data analysis team coded data for major themes. Key cultural health assets of the Somali and Oromo refugee communities revealed in this study include religion and religious beliefs, religious and cultural practices, a strong culture of sharing, interconnectedness, the prominence of oral traditions, traditional healthy eating and healthy lifestyles, traditional foods and medicine, and a strong cultural value placed on health. These cultural health assets can be used as building blocks for culturally relevant health interventions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218881
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.963
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.569

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLightfoot, E-
dc.contributor.authorBlevins, J-
dc.contributor.authorLum, TYS-
dc.contributor.authorDube, A-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:58:35Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:58:35Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 2016, v. 27 n. 1, p. 252-260-
dc.identifier.issn1049-2089-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218881-
dc.description.abstractThis community-based participatory research study sought to identify the cultural health assets of the Somali and Oromo communities in one Minnesota neighborhood that could be mobilized to develop culturally appropriate health interventions. Community asset mappers conducted 76 interviews with Somali and Oromo refugees in in Minnesota regarding the cultural assets of their community. A community-university data analysis team coded data for major themes. Key cultural health assets of the Somali and Oromo refugee communities revealed in this study include religion and religious beliefs, religious and cultural practices, a strong culture of sharing, interconnectedness, the prominence of oral traditions, traditional healthy eating and healthy lifestyles, traditional foods and medicine, and a strong cultural value placed on health. These cultural health assets can be used as building blocks for culturally relevant health interventions.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe Johns Hopkins University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_health_care_for_the_poor_and_underserved/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved-
dc.rightsJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. Copyright © The Johns Hopkins University Press.-
dc.titleCultural health assets of Somali and Oromo refugees and immigrants in Minnesota: Findings from a community-based participatory research project-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLum, TYS: tlum@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLum, TYS=rp01513-
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/hpu.2016.0023-
dc.identifier.hkuros252103-
dc.identifier.volume27-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage252-
dc.identifier.epage260-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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