File Download

Article: Coping with Illness Experiences in Patients with Schizophrenia: The Role of Peacefulness

TitleCoping with Illness Experiences in Patients with Schizophrenia: The Role of Peacefulness
Authors
KeywordsSchizophrenia
Peacefulness
Spirituality
Grounded theory
Issue Date2015
PublisherAustin Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://austinpublishinggroup.com/schizophrenia/
Citation
Journal of Schizophrenia Research, 2015, v. 2 n. 1, p. article no.1007 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The relationship between spirituality and schizophrenia is a largely unexplored, yet important area of research in psychiatry given its role in recovery from mental illness and in long-term care. Peacefulness, as one of the primary consequences of spirituality, was found to be most prominently associated with the emotional well-beings. This analysis aims to explore the concept of peacefulness among schizophrenic patients and its effect on their illness experiences. Methods: Eighteen early-stage schizophrenic patients were recruited from the outpatient clinic of a hospital in Hong Kong for an in-depth individual interview. Data were analyzed with grounded theory techniques. Results: Peacefulness has an emotional component and a cognitive component. The participants described peacefulness as a carefree state of mind that consisted of an inner sense of tranquility (the emotional component) and perceived freedom (the cognitive component). Their illness experiences were a vicious circle that was formed and maintained by distress (negative emotions) and preoccupation (distorted cognition). They believed that an inner sense of tranquility (the emotional component) facilitated the regulation of their distress, leaving them more cognitive resources to stabilize their chaotic minds, whereas perceived freedom (cognitive component) created an intra psychic moment and space with no stress to free the patients from their preoccupation. Conclusion: Peacefulness is able to break the vicious circle of patient’s illness experiences by moderating distress and preoccupation. In addition, it may help promote patients’ personal resilience and self-efficacy, which are important for coping with residual symptoms, maintaining the patients’ mental health and preventing relapse.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218843

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, CKP-
dc.contributor.authorLo, HYP-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTH-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:55:23Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:55:23Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Schizophrenia Research, 2015, v. 2 n. 1, p. article no.1007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218843-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The relationship between spirituality and schizophrenia is a largely unexplored, yet important area of research in psychiatry given its role in recovery from mental illness and in long-term care. Peacefulness, as one of the primary consequences of spirituality, was found to be most prominently associated with the emotional well-beings. This analysis aims to explore the concept of peacefulness among schizophrenic patients and its effect on their illness experiences. Methods: Eighteen early-stage schizophrenic patients were recruited from the outpatient clinic of a hospital in Hong Kong for an in-depth individual interview. Data were analyzed with grounded theory techniques. Results: Peacefulness has an emotional component and a cognitive component. The participants described peacefulness as a carefree state of mind that consisted of an inner sense of tranquility (the emotional component) and perceived freedom (the cognitive component). Their illness experiences were a vicious circle that was formed and maintained by distress (negative emotions) and preoccupation (distorted cognition). They believed that an inner sense of tranquility (the emotional component) facilitated the regulation of their distress, leaving them more cognitive resources to stabilize their chaotic minds, whereas perceived freedom (cognitive component) created an intra psychic moment and space with no stress to free the patients from their preoccupation. Conclusion: Peacefulness is able to break the vicious circle of patient’s illness experiences by moderating distress and preoccupation. In addition, it may help promote patients’ personal resilience and self-efficacy, which are important for coping with residual symptoms, maintaining the patients’ mental health and preventing relapse.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAustin Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://austinpublishinggroup.com/schizophrenia/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Schizophrenia Research-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectSchizophrenia-
dc.subjectPeacefulness-
dc.subjectSpirituality-
dc.subjectGrounded theory-
dc.titleCoping with Illness Experiences in Patients with Schizophrenia: The Role of Peacefulness-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros253663-
dc.identifier.volume2-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no.1007-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no.1007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats