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Article: Dorsal raphe nucleus projecting retinal ganglion cells: Why Y cells?

TitleDorsal raphe nucleus projecting retinal ganglion cells: Why Y cells?
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/neubiorev
Citation
Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 2015, v. 57, p. 118-131 How to Cite?
AbstractRetinal ganglion Y (alpha) cells are found in retinas ranging from frogs to mice to primates. The highly conserved nature of the large, fast conducting retinal Y cell is a testament to its fundamental task, although precisely that this task is remained ill-defined. The recent discovery that Y-alpha retinal ganglion cells send axon collaterals to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in addition to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN), pretectum and the superior colliculus (SC) has offered new insights into the important survival tasks performed by these cells with highly branched axons. We propose that in addition to its role in visual perception, the Y-alpha retinal ganglion cell provides concurrent signals via axon collaterals to the DRN, the major source of serotonergic afferents to the forebrain, to dramatically inhibit 5-HT activity during orientation or alerting/ escape responses, which disfacilitates ongoing tonic motor activity while dis-inhibiting sensory information processing throughout the visual system. The new data provide a fresh view of these evolutionarily old retinal ganglion cells.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218633
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.58
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.290

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPickard, GE-
dc.contributor.authorSo, KF-
dc.contributor.authorPu, ML-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:48:46Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:48:46Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationNeuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 2015, v. 57, p. 118-131-
dc.identifier.issn0149-7634-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218633-
dc.description.abstractRetinal ganglion Y (alpha) cells are found in retinas ranging from frogs to mice to primates. The highly conserved nature of the large, fast conducting retinal Y cell is a testament to its fundamental task, although precisely that this task is remained ill-defined. The recent discovery that Y-alpha retinal ganglion cells send axon collaterals to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in addition to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN), pretectum and the superior colliculus (SC) has offered new insights into the important survival tasks performed by these cells with highly branched axons. We propose that in addition to its role in visual perception, the Y-alpha retinal ganglion cell provides concurrent signals via axon collaterals to the DRN, the major source of serotonergic afferents to the forebrain, to dramatically inhibit 5-HT activity during orientation or alerting/ escape responses, which disfacilitates ongoing tonic motor activity while dis-inhibiting sensory information processing throughout the visual system. The new data provide a fresh view of these evolutionarily old retinal ganglion cells.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/neubiorev-
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews-
dc.titleDorsal raphe nucleus projecting retinal ganglion cells: Why Y cells?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF: hrmaskf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.08.004-
dc.identifier.pmid26363667-
dc.identifier.hkuros252213-
dc.identifier.volume57-
dc.identifier.spage118-
dc.identifier.epage131-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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