File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

Supplementary

Conference Paper: The role of the Class I acyl-CoA-binding protein family function in Arabidopsis cuticle formation

TitleThe role of the Class I acyl-CoA-binding protein family function in Arabidopsis cuticle formation
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherThe French Society of Plant Biologists (SFBV).
Citation
The 26th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research (ICAR), Paris, France, 5-9 July 2015. In Abstract Book, 2015, p. 112, abstract P277 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Arabidopsis thaliana Class I acyl-CoA-binding protein family was shown here to functi on in cuti cle formati on. This was achieved using T-DNA inserti onal mutants in Arabidopsis. The acbp mutants showed fewer wax crystals on the stem/leaf surfaces and displayed disrupted cuti cle layers in scanning and transmission electron microscopy, respecti vely. Cuti cular wax and cuti n monomer compositi on was found to be reduced in the mutants in comparison to the wild type when analyzed with gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS). Mutant ti ssue also had consistent reducti on in the expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of cuti cular wax and cuti n. To further investi gate the spati al expression of AtACBP, AtACBP promoter::Y-glucuronidase gene fusions were generated. Resultant transgenic Arabidopsis plants demonstrated GUS expression on the surfaces supporti ng its role in cuti cle formati on. Our fi ndings imply that the Class I ACBP family parti cipates in Arabidopsis cuti cular wax accumulati on by traffi cking very-long-chain acyl-CoAs to which recombinant forms are known to bind.
DescriptionPoster - Secondary metabolism: no. P277
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218089

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXue, Y-
dc.contributor.authorKim, J-
dc.contributor.authorLung, SC-
dc.contributor.authorSuh, MC-
dc.contributor.authorChye, ML-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:22:42Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:22:42Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 26th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research (ICAR), Paris, France, 5-9 July 2015. In Abstract Book, 2015, p. 112, abstract P277-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218089-
dc.descriptionPoster - Secondary metabolism: no. P277-
dc.description.abstractThe Arabidopsis thaliana Class I acyl-CoA-binding protein family was shown here to functi on in cuti cle formati on. This was achieved using T-DNA inserti onal mutants in Arabidopsis. The acbp mutants showed fewer wax crystals on the stem/leaf surfaces and displayed disrupted cuti cle layers in scanning and transmission electron microscopy, respecti vely. Cuti cular wax and cuti n monomer compositi on was found to be reduced in the mutants in comparison to the wild type when analyzed with gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS). Mutant ti ssue also had consistent reducti on in the expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of cuti cular wax and cuti n. To further investi gate the spati al expression of AtACBP, AtACBP promoter::Y-glucuronidase gene fusions were generated. Resultant transgenic Arabidopsis plants demonstrated GUS expression on the surfaces supporti ng its role in cuti cle formati on. Our fi ndings imply that the Class I ACBP family parti cipates in Arabidopsis cuti cular wax accumulati on by traffi cking very-long-chain acyl-CoAs to which recombinant forms are known to bind.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe French Society of Plant Biologists (SFBV). -
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Conference on Arabidopsis Research, ICAR 2015-
dc.titleThe role of the Class I acyl-CoA-binding protein family function in Arabidopsis cuticle formation-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailLung, SC: sclung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChye, ML: mlchye@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChye, ML=rp00687-
dc.identifier.hkuros251507-
dc.identifier.spage112, abstract P277-
dc.identifier.epage112, abstract P277-
dc.publisher.placeFrance-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats