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Article: Difficulties with computational coreference tracking: How to achieve ‘coherence in mind’ without a mind?

TitleDifficulties with computational coreference tracking: How to achieve ‘coherence in mind’ without a mind?
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
Linguistic Research, 2015, v. 32 n. 2, p. 451-468 How to Cite?
AbstractThe introduction and maintenance of reference in discourse is subject to a number of language-universal constraints on NP form and selection that allow speakers to maintain reference co-referentially (i.e. from mention to mention) with minimal processing effort across large spans of discourse. Automated approaches to co-reference resolution (i.e. the successful tracking of discourse referents across texts) use a variety of models to account for how a referent may be tracked co-referentially, yet automated co-reference resolution is still considered an incredibly difficult task for those working in natural language processing and generation, even when using ‘gold-standard’ manually-annotated discourse texts as a source of comparison. Less research has been conducted on the performance of automated co-reference resolution on narrative data, which is rich with multiple referents interacting with each other, with long sequences of continuous and non-continuous reference to be maintained. Five freely-available co-reference resolvers were trialled for accuracy on oral narrative data produced by English native speakers using a picture sequence as an elicitation device. However, accuracy levels of under 50% for each resolver tested suggest large differences between human and computational methods of co-reference resolution. In particular, zero anaphora, NPs with modifiers and errors in coding first-mentioned referents appear particularly problematic. This suggests that automated approaches to coreference resolution need a vast range of lexical knowledge, inferential capabilities based on situational and world knowledge, and the ability to track reference over extended discourse if they are to succeed in modelling human-like coreference resolution
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/217998

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCrosthwaite, PR-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:20:33Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:20:33Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationLinguistic Research, 2015, v. 32 n. 2, p. 451-468-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/217998-
dc.description.abstractThe introduction and maintenance of reference in discourse is subject to a number of language-universal constraints on NP form and selection that allow speakers to maintain reference co-referentially (i.e. from mention to mention) with minimal processing effort across large spans of discourse. Automated approaches to co-reference resolution (i.e. the successful tracking of discourse referents across texts) use a variety of models to account for how a referent may be tracked co-referentially, yet automated co-reference resolution is still considered an incredibly difficult task for those working in natural language processing and generation, even when using ‘gold-standard’ manually-annotated discourse texts as a source of comparison. Less research has been conducted on the performance of automated co-reference resolution on narrative data, which is rich with multiple referents interacting with each other, with long sequences of continuous and non-continuous reference to be maintained. Five freely-available co-reference resolvers were trialled for accuracy on oral narrative data produced by English native speakers using a picture sequence as an elicitation device. However, accuracy levels of under 50% for each resolver tested suggest large differences between human and computational methods of co-reference resolution. In particular, zero anaphora, NPs with modifiers and errors in coding first-mentioned referents appear particularly problematic. This suggests that automated approaches to coreference resolution need a vast range of lexical knowledge, inferential capabilities based on situational and world knowledge, and the ability to track reference over extended discourse if they are to succeed in modelling human-like coreference resolution-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofLinguistic Research-
dc.titleDifficulties with computational coreference tracking: How to achieve ‘coherence in mind’ without a mind?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCrosthwaite, PR: drprc80@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCrosthwaite, PR=rp01961-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.17250/khisli.32.2.201508.007-
dc.identifier.hkuros253005-
dc.identifier.volume32-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage451-
dc.identifier.epage468-

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