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Article: ‘Closer to God’: Child Death in Historical Perspective

Title‘Closer to God’: Child Death in Historical Perspective
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherThe Johns Hopkins University Press. The Journal's web site is located at https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_the_history_of_childhood_and_youth/
Citation
Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth, 2015, v. 8 n. 3, p. 353-377 How to Cite?
AbstractThose working within the sub-field of the modern history of childhood have rarely taken the dead child as their starting point. However, in a secularising, post-Enlightenment world elites pursuing ‘progress’ contemporaneously, and very publicly, reinterpreted death in relation to redefinitions of childhood as evidence of the divine. Dead children featured prominently within public modern mourning practices until, late in the nineteenth century scientific explorations of child death drove societies to occlude the presence of dead children. As infant mortality rates fell perceptions of children as a dangerous, unstable presence, and a threat to the nation grew. New spaces emerged to receive and conceal dead children. New literary and visual cultures recast living children’s relationship with death. And in the early twentieth century accidental deaths in commercial space, in reformatories and within the home inspired powerful debates over the future of childhood and society. This article surveys recent literature, raises key themes and introduces the articles featured in this special issue on the relatively under-research theme of child death.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/217977
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPomfret, DM-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:20:09Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:20:09Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the History of Childhood and Youth, 2015, v. 8 n. 3, p. 353-377-
dc.identifier.issn1939-6724-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/217977-
dc.description.abstractThose working within the sub-field of the modern history of childhood have rarely taken the dead child as their starting point. However, in a secularising, post-Enlightenment world elites pursuing ‘progress’ contemporaneously, and very publicly, reinterpreted death in relation to redefinitions of childhood as evidence of the divine. Dead children featured prominently within public modern mourning practices until, late in the nineteenth century scientific explorations of child death drove societies to occlude the presence of dead children. As infant mortality rates fell perceptions of children as a dangerous, unstable presence, and a threat to the nation grew. New spaces emerged to receive and conceal dead children. New literary and visual cultures recast living children’s relationship with death. And in the early twentieth century accidental deaths in commercial space, in reformatories and within the home inspired powerful debates over the future of childhood and society. This article surveys recent literature, raises key themes and introduces the articles featured in this special issue on the relatively under-research theme of child death.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe Johns Hopkins University Press. The Journal's web site is located at https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_the_history_of_childhood_and_youth/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the History of Childhood and Youth-
dc.rightsJournal of the History of Childhood and Youth. Copyright © The Johns Hopkins University Press.-
dc.rightsCopyright © <year> The Johns Hopkins University Press. This article first appeared in TITLE, Volume <#>, Issue <#>, <Month>, <Year>, pages <#-#>.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.title‘Closer to God’: Child Death in Historical Perspective-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailPomfret, DM: pomfretd@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityPomfret, DM=rp01194-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/hcy.2015.0041-
dc.identifier.hkuros251008-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage353-
dc.identifier.epage377-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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