File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Article: Transmission of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus in the long term care facilities in Hong Kong

TitleTransmission of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus in the long term care facilities in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
BMC Infectious Diseases, 2013, v. 13, p. 205 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground The relative contribution of long term care facilities (LTCFs) and hospitals in the transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is unknown. Methods Concurrent MRSA screening and spa type analysis was performed in LTCFs and their network hospitals to estimate the rate of MRSA acquisition among residents during their stay in LTCFs and hospitals, by colonization pressure and MRSA transmission calculations. Results In 40 LTCFs, 436 (21.6%) of 2020 residents were identified as ‘MRSA-positive’. The incidence of MRSA transmission per 1000-colonization-days among the residents during their stay in LTCFs and hospitals were 309 and 113 respectively, while the colonization pressure in LTCFs and hospitals were 210 and 185 per 1000-patient-days respectively. MRSA spa type t1081 was the most commonly isolated linage in both LTCF residents (76/121, 62.8%) and hospitalized patients (51/87, 58.6%), while type t4677 was significantly associated with LTCF residents (24/121, 19.8%) compared with hospitalized patients (3/87, 3.4%) (p < 0.001). This suggested continuous transmission of MRSA t4677 among LTCF residents. Also, an inverse linear relationship between MRSA prevalence in LTCFs and the average living area per LTCF resident was observed (Pearson correlation −0.443, p = 0.004), with the odds of patients acquiring MRSA reduced by a factor of 0.90 for each 10 square feet increase in living area. Conclusions Our data suggest that MRSA transmission was more serious in LTCFs than in hospitals. Infection control should be focused on LTCFs in order to reduce the burden of MRSA carriers in healthcare settings.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/217193

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, VCC-
dc.contributor.authorTai, JWM-
dc.contributor.authorWong, ZSY-
dc.contributor.authorChen, JHK-
dc.contributor.authorPan, KBQ-
dc.contributor.authorHai, YZ-
dc.contributor.authorNg, WC-
dc.contributor.authorChow, MK-
dc.contributor.authorYau, MCY-
dc.contributor.authorChan, JFW-
dc.contributor.authorWong, SCY-
dc.contributor.authorTse, H-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSC-
dc.contributor.authorTsui, KL-
dc.contributor.authorChan, FHW-
dc.contributor.authorHo, PL-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T05:51:32Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T05:51:32Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Infectious Diseases, 2013, v. 13, p. 205-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/217193-
dc.description.abstractBackground The relative contribution of long term care facilities (LTCFs) and hospitals in the transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is unknown. Methods Concurrent MRSA screening and spa type analysis was performed in LTCFs and their network hospitals to estimate the rate of MRSA acquisition among residents during their stay in LTCFs and hospitals, by colonization pressure and MRSA transmission calculations. Results In 40 LTCFs, 436 (21.6%) of 2020 residents were identified as ‘MRSA-positive’. The incidence of MRSA transmission per 1000-colonization-days among the residents during their stay in LTCFs and hospitals were 309 and 113 respectively, while the colonization pressure in LTCFs and hospitals were 210 and 185 per 1000-patient-days respectively. MRSA spa type t1081 was the most commonly isolated linage in both LTCF residents (76/121, 62.8%) and hospitalized patients (51/87, 58.6%), while type t4677 was significantly associated with LTCF residents (24/121, 19.8%) compared with hospitalized patients (3/87, 3.4%) (p < 0.001). This suggested continuous transmission of MRSA t4677 among LTCF residents. Also, an inverse linear relationship between MRSA prevalence in LTCFs and the average living area per LTCF resident was observed (Pearson correlation −0.443, p = 0.004), with the odds of patients acquiring MRSA reduced by a factor of 0.90 for each 10 square feet increase in living area. Conclusions Our data suggest that MRSA transmission was more serious in LTCFs than in hospitals. Infection control should be focused on LTCFs in order to reduce the burden of MRSA carriers in healthcare settings.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Infectious Diseases-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleTransmission of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus in the long term care facilities in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChow, MK: mkchow@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTse, H: htse@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, SSC: scsophia@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, PL: plho@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY: kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTse, H=rp00519-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SSC=rp00423-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PL=rp00406-
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2334-13-205-
dc.identifier.hkuros251171-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.spage205-
dc.identifier.epage205-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats