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Article: Incidence of influenza virus infections in children in Hong Kong in a 3-year randomized placebo-controlled vaccine study, 2009-2012

TitleIncidence of influenza virus infections in children in Hong Kong in a 3-year randomized placebo-controlled vaccine study, 2009-2012
Authors
KeywordsImmunity
Incidence rates
Influenza virus
Vaccination
Issue Date2014
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/
Citation
Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2014, v. 59 n. 4, p. 517-24 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. School-aged children suffer high rates of influenza virus infections and associated illnesses each year, and are a major source of transmission in the community. However, information on the cumulative incidence of infection in specific epidemics is scarce, and there are limited studies with sufficient follow-up to identify the strength and duration of protection against reinfection. Methods. We randomly allocated children 5-17 years of age to receive trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) or placebo from September 2009 through January 2010, and then conducted follow-up for 3 years including regular collection of sera, symptom diaries, and collection of nose and throat swabs during illness episodes in participants or their household members. Results. Of 796 children initially randomized, 484 continued to participate for all 3 years. In unvaccinated children, cumulative incidence of infection was estimated to be 59% in the first wave of H1N1pdm09 in 2009-2010, and 7%, 14%, 20%, and 31% in subsequent epidemics of H3N2 (2010), H1N1pdm09 (2011), B (2012), and H3N2 (2012), respectively. Infection with H1N1pdm09 in 2009-2010 and H3N2 in 2010 was associated with protection against infection with subsequent epidemics of the same subtype in 2011 and 2012, respectively, but we found no evidence of heterotypic or heterosubtypic protection against infection. Conclusions. We identified substantial incidence of influenza virus infections in children in Hong Kong in 5 major epidemics over a 3-year period, and evidence of homosubtypic but not heterosubtypic protection following infection. © The Author 2014.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216466
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 9.117
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.742
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ-
dc.contributor.authorPerera, RAPM-
dc.contributor.authorFang, J-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KH-
dc.contributor.authorLim Wai, SKW-
dc.contributor.authorSo, HC-
dc.contributor.authorChu, KW-
dc.contributor.authorWong, YT-
dc.contributor.authorShiu, EYC-
dc.contributor.authorNg, S-
dc.contributor.authorIp, DKM-
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GM-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T05:28:31Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T05:28:31Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Infectious Diseases, 2014, v. 59 n. 4, p. 517-24-
dc.identifier.issn1058-4838-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216466-
dc.description.abstractBackground. School-aged children suffer high rates of influenza virus infections and associated illnesses each year, and are a major source of transmission in the community. However, information on the cumulative incidence of infection in specific epidemics is scarce, and there are limited studies with sufficient follow-up to identify the strength and duration of protection against reinfection. Methods. We randomly allocated children 5-17 years of age to receive trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) or placebo from September 2009 through January 2010, and then conducted follow-up for 3 years including regular collection of sera, symptom diaries, and collection of nose and throat swabs during illness episodes in participants or their household members. Results. Of 796 children initially randomized, 484 continued to participate for all 3 years. In unvaccinated children, cumulative incidence of infection was estimated to be 59% in the first wave of H1N1pdm09 in 2009-2010, and 7%, 14%, 20%, and 31% in subsequent epidemics of H3N2 (2010), H1N1pdm09 (2011), B (2012), and H3N2 (2012), respectively. Infection with H1N1pdm09 in 2009-2010 and H3N2 in 2010 was associated with protection against infection with subsequent epidemics of the same subtype in 2011 and 2012, respectively, but we found no evidence of heterotypic or heterosubtypic protection against infection. Conclusions. We identified substantial incidence of influenza virus infections in children in Hong Kong in 5 major epidemics over a 3-year period, and evidence of homosubtypic but not heterosubtypic protection following infection. © The Author 2014.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Infectious Diseases-
dc.rightsPre-print: Journal Title] ©: [year] [owner as specified on the article] Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of xxxxxx]. All rights reserved. Pre-print (Once an article is published, preprint notice should be amended to): This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Article as published in the print edition of the Journal.] Post-print: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL that the author will receive upon publication here]. -
dc.subjectImmunity-
dc.subjectIncidence rates-
dc.subjectInfluenza virus-
dc.subjectVaccination-
dc.titleIncidence of influenza virus infections in children in Hong Kong in a 3-year randomized placebo-controlled vaccine study, 2009-2012-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPerera, RAPM: mahenp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFang, J: vickyf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KH: chankh2@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLim Wai, SKW: bwskw01@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSo, HC: haso9150@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChu, KW: dkwchu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, YT: wongytj@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailShiu, EYC: eyshiu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, DKM: dkmip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326-
dc.identifier.authorityPerera, RAPM=rp02500-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KH=rp01921-
dc.identifier.authorityChu, KW=rp02512-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, DKM=rp00256-
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/cid/ciu356-
dc.identifier.pmid24825868-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84905057156-
dc.identifier.hkuros251966-
dc.identifier.volume59-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage517-
dc.identifier.epage24-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000342921400014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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