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Article: The state, relational governance, and nomad sedentarization: Land reform in Inner Mongolia, 1900-1911

TitleThe state, relational governance, and nomad sedentarization: Land reform in Inner Mongolia, 1900-1911
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Comparative Studies in Society and History, 2014, v. 56, n. 3, p. 714-744 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article is a study of the Inner Mongolian land reform undertaken by the Qing government in the last decade of its rule. Instead of portraying land reform as a state process of taming and transforming nomads, I examine the metamorphosis of the multi-ethnic governing relationships enabled by the reform. The frontier governance system on which I focus consisted of coalitions and conflicts among four key players: Mongol banners, neighboring Han Chinese provinces, the Court of Dependencies, and frontier military governors. By elucidating the changing relationships that bound these players together, I pinpoint the most significant agendas of land reform, how the Mongols' position vis-à-vis state agencies changed throughout the reform process, and to what extent these changes resulted in state centralization. My study illuminates a variety of topics, including nomad sedentarization, frontier politics, and modern state expansion. © 2014 Society for the Comparative Study of Society and History.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216345
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.773
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.725

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Liping-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-14T12:19:47Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-14T12:19:47Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationComparative Studies in Society and History, 2014, v. 56, n. 3, p. 714-744-
dc.identifier.issn0010-4175-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216345-
dc.description.abstractThis article is a study of the Inner Mongolian land reform undertaken by the Qing government in the last decade of its rule. Instead of portraying land reform as a state process of taming and transforming nomads, I examine the metamorphosis of the multi-ethnic governing relationships enabled by the reform. The frontier governance system on which I focus consisted of coalitions and conflicts among four key players: Mongol banners, neighboring Han Chinese provinces, the Court of Dependencies, and frontier military governors. By elucidating the changing relationships that bound these players together, I pinpoint the most significant agendas of land reform, how the Mongols' position vis-à-vis state agencies changed throughout the reform process, and to what extent these changes resulted in state centralization. My study illuminates a variety of topics, including nomad sedentarization, frontier politics, and modern state expansion. © 2014 Society for the Comparative Study of Society and History.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofComparative Studies in Society and History-
dc.titleThe state, relational governance, and nomad sedentarization: Land reform in Inner Mongolia, 1900-1911-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0010417514000309-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84904600310-
dc.identifier.hkuros262665-
dc.identifier.volume56-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage714-
dc.identifier.epage744-
dc.identifier.eissn1475-2999-

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