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Article: Synthesis and physicochemical analysis of interpenetrating networks containing modified gelatin and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate

TitleSynthesis and physicochemical analysis of interpenetrating networks containing modified gelatin and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate
Authors
KeywordsTensile properties
Biomaterials
Drug delivery
Ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride
Swelling/degradation
Issue Date2003
Citation
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A, 2003, v. 67, n. 1, p. 224-234 How to Cite?
AbstractThe interrelated effects of gelatin modification, content, and poly(ethylene glycol) molecular weight on the melting temperature, surface hydrophilicity, tensile properties, swelling/degradation, and drug-release kinetics of a novel interpenetrating network (IPN) system containing gelatin and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate were evaluated. Gelatin content had a large effect on the IPN melting temperature and ΔH. Modifying gelatin with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and/or monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol) monoacetate ester as well as increasing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate molecular weight increased the surface hydrophilicity. Increasing the gelatin weight percent increased the IPN elasticity at room temperature. When buffer and elevated temperature were present in the testing environment, the elasticity of all IPNs tested decreased. IPNs showed an enhanced elasticity and strength when compared with glutaraldehyde-fixed gelatin hydrogels. The extent of IPN swelling and degradation was increased by increasing the gelatin content or by modifying gelatin. The time to complete sample degradation was longer for IPNs when compared with gelatin crosslinked with glutaraldehyde. Modifications to the IPN system increased the maximum percent of chlorhexidine digluconate released from the IPNs. The rate of complete drug release was slower from IPNs than from glutaraldehyde-fixed gelatin matrices. A wide range of IPN physicochemical properties was obtained through formulation changes and chemical modifications. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216171
ISSN
2004 Impact Factor: 3.652
2006 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.474

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBurmania, Jeanine A.-
dc.contributor.authorMartinez-Diaz, Gabriel J.-
dc.contributor.authorKao, Weiyuan John-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-25T10:22:10Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-25T10:22:10Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A, 2003, v. 67, n. 1, p. 224-234-
dc.identifier.issn0021-9304-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216171-
dc.description.abstractThe interrelated effects of gelatin modification, content, and poly(ethylene glycol) molecular weight on the melting temperature, surface hydrophilicity, tensile properties, swelling/degradation, and drug-release kinetics of a novel interpenetrating network (IPN) system containing gelatin and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate were evaluated. Gelatin content had a large effect on the IPN melting temperature and ΔH. Modifying gelatin with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and/or monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol) monoacetate ester as well as increasing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate molecular weight increased the surface hydrophilicity. Increasing the gelatin weight percent increased the IPN elasticity at room temperature. When buffer and elevated temperature were present in the testing environment, the elasticity of all IPNs tested decreased. IPNs showed an enhanced elasticity and strength when compared with glutaraldehyde-fixed gelatin hydrogels. The extent of IPN swelling and degradation was increased by increasing the gelatin content or by modifying gelatin. The time to complete sample degradation was longer for IPNs when compared with gelatin crosslinked with glutaraldehyde. Modifications to the IPN system increased the maximum percent of chlorhexidine digluconate released from the IPNs. The rate of complete drug release was slower from IPNs than from glutaraldehyde-fixed gelatin matrices. A wide range of IPN physicochemical properties was obtained through formulation changes and chemical modifications. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A-
dc.subjectTensile properties-
dc.subjectBiomaterials-
dc.subjectDrug delivery-
dc.subjectEthylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride-
dc.subjectSwelling/degradation-
dc.titleSynthesis and physicochemical analysis of interpenetrating networks containing modified gelatin and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid14517880-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0345168971-
dc.identifier.volume67-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage224-
dc.identifier.epage234-

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