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Article: In vivo modulation of host response and macrophage behavior by polymer networks grafted with fibronectin-derived biomimetic oligopeptides: The role of RGD and PHSRN domains

TitleIn vivo modulation of host response and macrophage behavior by polymer networks grafted with fibronectin-derived biomimetic oligopeptides: The role of RGD and PHSRN domains
Authors
KeywordsExtracellular matrix proteins
Polyethyleneglycols
Leukocytes
Inflammation
Foreign body giant cells
Issue Date2001
Citation
Biomaterials, 2001, v. 22, n. 21, p. 2901-2909 How to Cite?
AbstractPolymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes/macrophages, foreign body giant cells (FBGC), and lymphocytes are central in directing the host foreign body and inflammatory/immune reactions that impact material biostability, biocompatibility, and device efficacy. We employed the functional architecture of fibronectin to probe the mechanisms of protein-cell interaction in modulating leukocyte behavior. We demonstrated previously that the RGD and PHSRN domain of fibronectin and the spatial orientation between the motifs were crucial in regulating macrophage function in vitro. The current study delineates the role of RGD and PHSRN in modulating the host inflammatory response and macrophage behavior in vivo. Oligopeptides containing RGD and/or PHSRN domains were grafted onto a polyethyleneglycol-based substrate and subcutaneously cage implanted into rats. Peptide identity played a minimal role in modulating the host inflammatory response and adherent macrophage density. The RGD motif, either alone or at the terminal position with the PHSRN-containing flanking sequence, elicited a rapid macrophage fusion to form FBGCs at the early stage of implantation. Both the RGD motif and the PHSRN motif were important in mediating FBGC formation at the later implantation time. However, the PHSRN motif, specifically in the configuration of G3RGDG6PHSRNG, evoked a larger extent of FBGC coverage. Our results indicate the importance of RGD and PHSRN in modulating macrophage function in a time and orientation dependent fashion in vivo. © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216159
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.387
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.565

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKao, Weiyuan John-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Damian-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-25T10:22:04Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-25T10:22:04Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.citationBiomaterials, 2001, v. 22, n. 21, p. 2901-2909-
dc.identifier.issn0142-9612-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216159-
dc.description.abstractPolymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes/macrophages, foreign body giant cells (FBGC), and lymphocytes are central in directing the host foreign body and inflammatory/immune reactions that impact material biostability, biocompatibility, and device efficacy. We employed the functional architecture of fibronectin to probe the mechanisms of protein-cell interaction in modulating leukocyte behavior. We demonstrated previously that the RGD and PHSRN domain of fibronectin and the spatial orientation between the motifs were crucial in regulating macrophage function in vitro. The current study delineates the role of RGD and PHSRN in modulating the host inflammatory response and macrophage behavior in vivo. Oligopeptides containing RGD and/or PHSRN domains were grafted onto a polyethyleneglycol-based substrate and subcutaneously cage implanted into rats. Peptide identity played a minimal role in modulating the host inflammatory response and adherent macrophage density. The RGD motif, either alone or at the terminal position with the PHSRN-containing flanking sequence, elicited a rapid macrophage fusion to form FBGCs at the early stage of implantation. Both the RGD motif and the PHSRN motif were important in mediating FBGC formation at the later implantation time. However, the PHSRN motif, specifically in the configuration of G3RGDG6PHSRNG, evoked a larger extent of FBGC coverage. Our results indicate the importance of RGD and PHSRN in modulating macrophage function in a time and orientation dependent fashion in vivo. © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBiomaterials-
dc.subjectExtracellular matrix proteins-
dc.subjectPolyethyleneglycols-
dc.subjectLeukocytes-
dc.subjectInflammation-
dc.subjectForeign body giant cells-
dc.titleIn vivo modulation of host response and macrophage behavior by polymer networks grafted with fibronectin-derived biomimetic oligopeptides: The role of RGD and PHSRN domains-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0142-9612(01)00037-0-
dc.identifier.pmid11561896-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034910711-
dc.identifier.volume22-
dc.identifier.issue21-
dc.identifier.spage2901-
dc.identifier.epage2909-

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