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Article: Evaluation of protein-modulated macrophage behavior on biomaterials: Designing biomimetic materials for cellular engineering

TitleEvaluation of protein-modulated macrophage behavior on biomaterials: Designing biomimetic materials for cellular engineering
Authors
KeywordsInflammation
Polyurethane
Polyethyleneglycol
Peptide
Foreign body giant cells
Issue Date1999
Citation
Biomaterials, 1999, v. 20, n. 23-24, p. 2213-2221 How to Cite?
AbstractMacrophage is a central cell type in directing host inflammatory and immune processes; hence, its response to biomaterials (i.e. adhesion and giant cell formation) has a direct impact on material biostability and biocompatibility. In this paper, several in vitro and in vivo techniques from previously published results and current investigations are highlighted and presented to demonstrate means of delineating a part of the complex molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction between biomaterials and macrophages. Complement component C3 was found critical in mediating the initial adhesion of human macrophages on medical-grade polyetherurethaneureas. From radioimmunoassay studies, the presence of a diphenolic antioxidant additive in polyetherurethaneureas increased the propensity for complement upregulation but did not affect adherent macrophage density. The subcutaneous cage-implant system was utilized to confirm the role of interleukin-4 in the fusion of adherent macrophages to form foreign body giant cells on polyurethanes in vivo. To probe the function-structural relationship of macrophage-active proteins, fibronectin was employed as a model in the formulation of synthetic oligopeptide mimetics. Peptides were grafted onto previously developed, non-cell adhesive polyethyleneglycol-based networks. The results indicate that grafted tripeptide RGD sequence supported higher adherent macrophage density than surfaces grafted with other peptides such as PHSRN and PRRARV sequences. However, the formation of foreign body giant cells on peptide-grafted networks was highly dependent on the relative orientation between PHSRN and RGD sequences located in a single peptide. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216155
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.387
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.565

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKao, Weiyuan John-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-25T10:22:00Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-25T10:22:00Z-
dc.date.issued1999-
dc.identifier.citationBiomaterials, 1999, v. 20, n. 23-24, p. 2213-2221-
dc.identifier.issn0142-9612-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216155-
dc.description.abstractMacrophage is a central cell type in directing host inflammatory and immune processes; hence, its response to biomaterials (i.e. adhesion and giant cell formation) has a direct impact on material biostability and biocompatibility. In this paper, several in vitro and in vivo techniques from previously published results and current investigations are highlighted and presented to demonstrate means of delineating a part of the complex molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction between biomaterials and macrophages. Complement component C3 was found critical in mediating the initial adhesion of human macrophages on medical-grade polyetherurethaneureas. From radioimmunoassay studies, the presence of a diphenolic antioxidant additive in polyetherurethaneureas increased the propensity for complement upregulation but did not affect adherent macrophage density. The subcutaneous cage-implant system was utilized to confirm the role of interleukin-4 in the fusion of adherent macrophages to form foreign body giant cells on polyurethanes in vivo. To probe the function-structural relationship of macrophage-active proteins, fibronectin was employed as a model in the formulation of synthetic oligopeptide mimetics. Peptides were grafted onto previously developed, non-cell adhesive polyethyleneglycol-based networks. The results indicate that grafted tripeptide RGD sequence supported higher adherent macrophage density than surfaces grafted with other peptides such as PHSRN and PRRARV sequences. However, the formation of foreign body giant cells on peptide-grafted networks was highly dependent on the relative orientation between PHSRN and RGD sequences located in a single peptide. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBiomaterials-
dc.subjectInflammation-
dc.subjectPolyurethane-
dc.subjectPolyethyleneglycol-
dc.subjectPeptide-
dc.subjectForeign body giant cells-
dc.titleEvaluation of protein-modulated macrophage behavior on biomaterials: Designing biomimetic materials for cellular engineering-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0142-9612(99)00152-0-
dc.identifier.pmid10614928-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032704210-
dc.identifier.volume20-
dc.identifier.issue23-24-
dc.identifier.spage2213-
dc.identifier.epage2221-

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