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Article: Recent Advances in Biomedical Polyurethane Biostability and Biodegradation

TitleRecent Advances in Biomedical Polyurethane Biostability and Biodegradation
Authors
KeywordsBiodegradation
Polyurethanes
In vivo studies
In vitro studies
Biostability
Issue Date1998
Citation
Polymer International, 1998, v. 46, n. 3, p. 163-171 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper summarizes our recent efforts to better understand the effects of antioxidants, the effects of strain-state, mechanistic studies of soft segment cleavage by reactive oxygen radicals, and the effects of different soft segment chemistries on the biostability/biodegradation of polyether polyurethanes (PEUUs). In vivo cage implant system studies and in vitro cobalt ion/ hydrogen peroxide studies have been carried out on PEUUs and the polymers have been analysed by attenuated total reflectance and Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) characterization of the PEUU surfaces. The natural antioxidant, vitamin E, has been shown to inhibit biodegradation and enhance biostability of PEUUs. Studies of the effect of stress state on PEUU biodegradation demonstrate that stress can inhibit biodegradation. While polyether soft segments may be cleaved by the presence of reactive oxygen radicals, the presence of oxygen has a profound effect in accelerating biodegradation. The biodegradation of polyurethanes may be inhibited by substituting different chemistries such as polydimethylsiloxanes, polycarbonates, and hydrocarbon soft segments for the polyether soft segments. To safely utilize polyurethanes in long-term biomedical devices, the biodegradation mechanisms of polyurethane elastomers must be fully understood and subsequently prevented. © 1998 SCI.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216152
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.414
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.762

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, James M.-
dc.contributor.authorHiltner, Anne-
dc.contributor.authorWiggins, Michael J.-
dc.contributor.authorSchubert, Mark A.-
dc.contributor.authorCollier, Terry O.-
dc.contributor.authorKao, W. John-
dc.contributor.authorMathur, Anshu B.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-25T10:21:57Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-25T10:21:57Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationPolymer International, 1998, v. 46, n. 3, p. 163-171-
dc.identifier.issn0959-8103-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216152-
dc.description.abstractThis paper summarizes our recent efforts to better understand the effects of antioxidants, the effects of strain-state, mechanistic studies of soft segment cleavage by reactive oxygen radicals, and the effects of different soft segment chemistries on the biostability/biodegradation of polyether polyurethanes (PEUUs). In vivo cage implant system studies and in vitro cobalt ion/ hydrogen peroxide studies have been carried out on PEUUs and the polymers have been analysed by attenuated total reflectance and Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) characterization of the PEUU surfaces. The natural antioxidant, vitamin E, has been shown to inhibit biodegradation and enhance biostability of PEUUs. Studies of the effect of stress state on PEUU biodegradation demonstrate that stress can inhibit biodegradation. While polyether soft segments may be cleaved by the presence of reactive oxygen radicals, the presence of oxygen has a profound effect in accelerating biodegradation. The biodegradation of polyurethanes may be inhibited by substituting different chemistries such as polydimethylsiloxanes, polycarbonates, and hydrocarbon soft segments for the polyether soft segments. To safely utilize polyurethanes in long-term biomedical devices, the biodegradation mechanisms of polyurethane elastomers must be fully understood and subsequently prevented. © 1998 SCI.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPolymer International-
dc.subjectBiodegradation-
dc.subjectPolyurethanes-
dc.subjectIn vivo studies-
dc.subjectIn vitro studies-
dc.subjectBiostability-
dc.titleRecent Advances in Biomedical Polyurethane Biostability and Biodegradation-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032119781-
dc.identifier.volume46-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage163-
dc.identifier.epage171-

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