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Article: The effect of depressive symptoms and antidepressant use on subsequent physical decline and number of hospitalizations in nursing home residents: A 9-year longitudinal study

TitleThe effect of depressive symptoms and antidepressant use on subsequent physical decline and number of hospitalizations in nursing home residents: A 9-year longitudinal study
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 2015, v. 16 n. 12, p. 1048-1054 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To investigate whether depressive symptoms and antidepressant use at baseline predict the subsequent decline in physical functioning and number of hospitalizations in nursing home residents. Design: Observational study based on Minimum Data Set (MDS) 2.0. Setting: Six nursing homes in Hong Kong. Participants: All nursing home residents (n = 1076) assessed with the MDS 2.0 in 2005 followed until 2013. Measurements: Outcome variables included annual performance in activities of daily living (ADLs) and number of hospitalizations within 90 days before each assessment. The presence of depressive symptoms at baseline was measured by the Resident Assessment Protocol triggered from the MDS 2.0 assessment. Records of antidepressant use and other control variables were exacted directly from the MDS 2.0 assessment. Results: The presence of baseline depressive symptoms did not have significant association with baseline ADLs and number of hospitalizations according to the multilevel mixed-effect model. However, it was associated with a faster deterioration of physical functioning (coefficient 0.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.00–0.07) and an increase in the number of hospitalizations (coefficient 0.05; 95% CI 0.03–0.07). No significant difference between elders using antidepressants and elders who were free from depressive symptoms was observed. If depressive symptoms were presented but antidepressants were not used, a much sharper decline was evident (coefficient 0.06; 95% CI 0.02–0.09). Conclusions: This study provided evidence that the presence of depressive symptoms is associated with more utilization of health care services. However, the use of antidepressants may play a significant role in altering the trajectory. The presence of depressive symptoms is a worrisome but treatable condition. Effective intervention/treatment should be called on.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216009

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuo, H-
dc.contributor.authorTang, YMJ-
dc.contributor.authorWong, GHY-
dc.contributor.authorChen, CC-
dc.contributor.authorLum, TYS-
dc.contributor.authorChi, I-
dc.contributor.authorLou, VW-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T13:48:05Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T13:48:05Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the American Medical Directors Association, 2015, v. 16 n. 12, p. 1048-1054-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216009-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate whether depressive symptoms and antidepressant use at baseline predict the subsequent decline in physical functioning and number of hospitalizations in nursing home residents. Design: Observational study based on Minimum Data Set (MDS) 2.0. Setting: Six nursing homes in Hong Kong. Participants: All nursing home residents (n = 1076) assessed with the MDS 2.0 in 2005 followed until 2013. Measurements: Outcome variables included annual performance in activities of daily living (ADLs) and number of hospitalizations within 90 days before each assessment. The presence of depressive symptoms at baseline was measured by the Resident Assessment Protocol triggered from the MDS 2.0 assessment. Records of antidepressant use and other control variables were exacted directly from the MDS 2.0 assessment. Results: The presence of baseline depressive symptoms did not have significant association with baseline ADLs and number of hospitalizations according to the multilevel mixed-effect model. However, it was associated with a faster deterioration of physical functioning (coefficient 0.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.00–0.07) and an increase in the number of hospitalizations (coefficient 0.05; 95% CI 0.03–0.07). No significant difference between elders using antidepressants and elders who were free from depressive symptoms was observed. If depressive symptoms were presented but antidepressants were not used, a much sharper decline was evident (coefficient 0.06; 95% CI 0.02–0.09). Conclusions: This study provided evidence that the presence of depressive symptoms is associated with more utilization of health care services. However, the use of antidepressants may play a significant role in altering the trajectory. The presence of depressive symptoms is a worrisome but treatable condition. Effective intervention/treatment should be called on.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Medical Directors Association-
dc.titleThe effect of depressive symptoms and antidepressant use on subsequent physical decline and number of hospitalizations in nursing home residents: A 9-year longitudinal study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLuo, H: haoluo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTang, YMJ: jennitym@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, GHY: ghywong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, CC: cocochen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLum, TYS: tlum@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLou, VW: wlou@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTang, YMJ=rp01997-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, GHY=rp01850-
dc.identifier.authorityLum, TYS=rp01513-
dc.identifier.authorityLou, VW=rp00607-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jamda.2015.06.016-
dc.identifier.hkuros249619-
dc.identifier.hkuros260670-
dc.identifier.volume16-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spage1048-
dc.identifier.epage1054-

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