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Book Chapter: All Dogs Deserve to be Beaten: Negotiating Manhood and Nationhood in Chinese TV Dramas

TitleAll Dogs Deserve to be Beaten: Negotiating Manhood and Nationhood in Chinese TV Dramas
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherHong Kong University Press
Citation
All Dogs Deserve to be Beaten: Negotiating Manhood and Nationhood in Chinese TV Dramas. In Louie, Kam (Ed.), Changing Chinese Masculinities: From Imperial Pillars of State to Global Real Men. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2016 How to Cite?
AbstractThe interconnection between nationalism and masculinity in Chinese popular culture has attracted scholarly attention in recent years (Song 2010; Song and Hird 2014). Nationalist sentiments and the images of national heroes in the Chinese media have increasingly become distinctly Chinese characteristics of masculinity in the global age. Perhaps the most conspicuous examples can be found in TV dramas (dianshi lianxuju), an overwhelmingly popular and influential form of entertainment in contemporary China. This chapter discusses the centrality of nationalism in the televisual construction of masculinity in post-socialist China, with a particular focus on a 70-episode drama series entitled The Dog-beating Staff (Dagou gun), a nationwide smash hit in 2013, and explores how television represents a “happy marriage” between the state’s agenda and popular social desire through representations of nationalism and masculinity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/215953
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSong, G-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T13:45:57Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T13:45:57Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationAll Dogs Deserve to be Beaten: Negotiating Manhood and Nationhood in Chinese TV Dramas. In Louie, Kam (Ed.), Changing Chinese Masculinities: From Imperial Pillars of State to Global Real Men. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2016-
dc.identifier.isbn9789888208562-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/215953-
dc.description.abstractThe interconnection between nationalism and masculinity in Chinese popular culture has attracted scholarly attention in recent years (Song 2010; Song and Hird 2014). Nationalist sentiments and the images of national heroes in the Chinese media have increasingly become distinctly Chinese characteristics of masculinity in the global age. Perhaps the most conspicuous examples can be found in TV dramas (dianshi lianxuju), an overwhelmingly popular and influential form of entertainment in contemporary China. This chapter discusses the centrality of nationalism in the televisual construction of masculinity in post-socialist China, with a particular focus on a 70-episode drama series entitled The Dog-beating Staff (Dagou gun), a nationwide smash hit in 2013, and explores how television represents a “happy marriage” between the state’s agenda and popular social desire through representations of nationalism and masculinity.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherHong Kong University Press-
dc.relation.ispartofChanging Chinese Masculinities: From Imperial Pillars of State to Global Real Men-
dc.titleAll Dogs Deserve to be Beaten: Negotiating Manhood and Nationhood in Chinese TV Dramas-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailSong, G: gsong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySong, G=rp01648-
dc.identifier.hkuros246061-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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