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Article: Assessing the validity of single-item life satisfaction measures: results from three large samples.

TitleAssessing the validity of single-item life satisfaction measures: results from three large samples.
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Quality of Life Research, 2014, v. 23, p. 2809-2818 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose The present paper assessed the validity of single-item life satisfaction measures by comparing single-item measures to the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS)—a more psychometrically established measure. Methods Two large samples from Washington (N = 13,064) and Oregon (N = 2,277) recruited by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and a representative German sample (N = 1,312) recruited by the Germany Socio-Economic Panel were included in the present analyses. Single-item life satisfaction measures and the SWLS were correlated with theoretically relevant variables, such as demographics, subjective health, domain satisfaction, and affect. The correlations between the two life satisfaction measures and these variables were examined to assess the construct validity of single-item life satisfaction measures. Results Consistent across three samples, single-item life satisfaction measures demonstrated substantial degree of criterion validity with the SWLS (zero-order r = 0.62–0.64; disattenuated r = 0.78–0.80). Patterns of statistical significance for correlations with theoretically relevant variables were the same across single-item measures and the SWLS. Single-item measures did not produce systematically different correlations compared to the SWLS (average difference = 0.001–0.005). The average absolute difference in the magnitudes of the correlations produced by single-item measures and the SWLS was very small (average absolute difference = 0.015–0.042). Conclusions Single-item life satisfaction measures performed very similarly compared to the multiple-item SWLS. Social scientists would get virtually identical answer to substantive questions regardless of which measure they use.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/215604
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CKF-
dc.contributor.authorLucas, REL-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T13:32:16Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T13:32:16Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationQuality of Life Research, 2014, v. 23, p. 2809-2818-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/215604-
dc.description.abstractPurpose The present paper assessed the validity of single-item life satisfaction measures by comparing single-item measures to the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS)—a more psychometrically established measure. Methods Two large samples from Washington (N = 13,064) and Oregon (N = 2,277) recruited by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and a representative German sample (N = 1,312) recruited by the Germany Socio-Economic Panel were included in the present analyses. Single-item life satisfaction measures and the SWLS were correlated with theoretically relevant variables, such as demographics, subjective health, domain satisfaction, and affect. The correlations between the two life satisfaction measures and these variables were examined to assess the construct validity of single-item life satisfaction measures. Results Consistent across three samples, single-item life satisfaction measures demonstrated substantial degree of criterion validity with the SWLS (zero-order r = 0.62–0.64; disattenuated r = 0.78–0.80). Patterns of statistical significance for correlations with theoretically relevant variables were the same across single-item measures and the SWLS. Single-item measures did not produce systematically different correlations compared to the SWLS (average difference = 0.001–0.005). The average absolute difference in the magnitudes of the correlations produced by single-item measures and the SWLS was very small (average absolute difference = 0.015–0.042). Conclusions Single-item life satisfaction measures performed very similarly compared to the multiple-item SWLS. Social scientists would get virtually identical answer to substantive questions regardless of which measure they use.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofQuality of Life Research-
dc.titleAssessing the validity of single-item life satisfaction measures: results from three large samples.-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, CKF: felixckc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11136-014-0726-4-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4221492-
dc.identifier.hkuros247948-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.spage2809-
dc.identifier.epage2818-

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