File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Evidence of carbon fixation pathway in a bacterium from Candidate Phylum SBR1093 revealed with genomic analysis

TitleEvidence of carbon fixation pathway in a bacterium from Candidate Phylum SBR1093 revealed with genomic analysis
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2014, v. 9 n. 10, p. e109571 How to Cite?
AbstractAutotrophic CO2 fixation is the most important biotransformation process in the biosphere. Research focusing on the diversity and distribution of relevant autotrophs is significant to our comprehension of the biosphere. In this study, a draft genome of a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 was reconstructed with the metagenome of an industrial activated sludge. Based on comparative genomics, this autotrophy may occur via a newly discovered carbon fixation path, the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate (HPHB) cycle, which was demonstrated in a previous work to be uniquely possessed by some genera from Archaea. This bacterium possesses all of the thirteen enzymes required for the HPHB cycle; these enzymes share 30 similar to 50% identity with those in the autotrophic species of Archaea that undergo the HPHB cycle and 30 similar to 80% identity with the corresponding enzymes of the mixotrophic species within Bradyrhizobiaceae. Thus, this bacterium might have an autotrophic growth mode in certain conditions. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene reveals that the phylotypes within candidate phylum SBR1093 are primarily clustered into 5 clades with a shallow branching pattern. This bacterium is clustered with phylotypes from organically contaminated environments, implying a demand for organics in heterotrophic metabolism. Considering the types of regulators, such as FnR, Fur, and ArsR, this bacterium might be a facultative aerobic mixotroph with potential multi-antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. This is the first report on Bacteria that may perform potential carbon fixation via the HPHB cycle, thus may expand our knowledge of the distribution and importance of the HPHB cycle in the biosphere.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/215203
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
ISI Accession Number ID
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Z-
dc.contributor.authorGuo, F-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, L-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, T-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T13:17:51Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T13:17:51Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE, 2014, v. 9 n. 10, p. e109571-
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/215203-
dc.description.abstractAutotrophic CO2 fixation is the most important biotransformation process in the biosphere. Research focusing on the diversity and distribution of relevant autotrophs is significant to our comprehension of the biosphere. In this study, a draft genome of a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 was reconstructed with the metagenome of an industrial activated sludge. Based on comparative genomics, this autotrophy may occur via a newly discovered carbon fixation path, the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate (HPHB) cycle, which was demonstrated in a previous work to be uniquely possessed by some genera from Archaea. This bacterium possesses all of the thirteen enzymes required for the HPHB cycle; these enzymes share 30 similar to 50% identity with those in the autotrophic species of Archaea that undergo the HPHB cycle and 30 similar to 80% identity with the corresponding enzymes of the mixotrophic species within Bradyrhizobiaceae. Thus, this bacterium might have an autotrophic growth mode in certain conditions. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene reveals that the phylotypes within candidate phylum SBR1093 are primarily clustered into 5 clades with a shallow branching pattern. This bacterium is clustered with phylotypes from organically contaminated environments, implying a demand for organics in heterotrophic metabolism. Considering the types of regulators, such as FnR, Fur, and ArsR, this bacterium might be a facultative aerobic mixotroph with potential multi-antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. This is the first report on Bacteria that may perform potential carbon fixation via the HPHB cycle, thus may expand our knowledge of the distribution and importance of the HPHB cycle in the biosphere.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleEvidence of carbon fixation pathway in a bacterium from Candidate Phylum SBR1093 revealed with genomic analysis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, T: zhangt@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, T=rp00211-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0109571-
dc.identifier.pmid25310003-
dc.identifier.hkuros249668-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spagee109571-
dc.identifier.epagee109571-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000343210300057-
dc.relation.projectExploring biodegradation pathway and associated genes for emerging pollutants using high-resolution LC-QToF-MS and high-throughput sequencing-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats