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Article: Epstein-Barr virus infection and persistence in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells

TitleEpstein-Barr virus infection and persistence in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cjcsysu.cn/
Citation
Chinese Journal of Cancer, 2014, v. 33 n. 11, p. 549-555 How to Cite?
AbstractEpstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is closely associated with undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), strongly implicating a role for EBV in NPC pathogenesis; conversely, EBV infection is rarely detected in normal nasopharyngeal epithelial tissues. In general, EBV does not show a strong tropism for infecting human epithelial cells, and EBV infection in oropharyngeal epithelial cells is believed to be lytic in nature. To establish life-long infection in humans, EBV has evolved efficient strategies to infect B cells and hijack their cellular machinery for latent infection. Lytic EBV infection in oropharyngeal epithelial cells, though an infrequent event, is believed to be a major source of infectious EBV particles for salivary transmission. The biological events associated with nasopharyngeal epithelial cells are only beginning to be understood with the advancement of EBV infection methods and the availability of nasopharyngeal epithelial cell models for EBV infection studies. EBV infection in human epithelial cells is a highly inefficient process compared to that in B cells, which express the complement receptor type 2 (CR2) to mediate EBV infection. Although receptor(s) on the epithelial cell surface for EBV infection remain(s) to be identified, EBV infection in epithelial cells could be achieved via the interaction of glycoproteins on the viral envelope with surface integrins on epithelial cells, which might trigger membrane fusion to internalize EBV in cells. Normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells are not permissive for latent EBV infection, and EBV infection in normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells usually results in growth arrest. However, genetic alterations in premalignant nasopharyngeal epithelial cells, including p16 deletion and cyclin D1 overexpression, could override the growth inhibitory effect of EBV infection to support stable and latent EBV infection in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. The EBV episome in NPC is clonal in nature, suggesting that NPC develops from a single EBV-infected nasopharyngeal epithelial cell, and the establishment of persistent and latent EBV infection in premalignant nasopharyngeal epithelium may represent an early and critical event for NPC development.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/215077
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.814
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.081
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsang, CM-
dc.contributor.authorDeng, W-
dc.contributor.authorYip, YL-
dc.contributor.authorZeng, MS-
dc.contributor.authorLo, KW-
dc.contributor.authorTsao, GSW-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T12:25:01Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T12:25:01Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationChinese Journal of Cancer, 2014, v. 33 n. 11, p. 549-555-
dc.identifier.issn1000-467X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/215077-
dc.description.abstractEpstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is closely associated with undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), strongly implicating a role for EBV in NPC pathogenesis; conversely, EBV infection is rarely detected in normal nasopharyngeal epithelial tissues. In general, EBV does not show a strong tropism for infecting human epithelial cells, and EBV infection in oropharyngeal epithelial cells is believed to be lytic in nature. To establish life-long infection in humans, EBV has evolved efficient strategies to infect B cells and hijack their cellular machinery for latent infection. Lytic EBV infection in oropharyngeal epithelial cells, though an infrequent event, is believed to be a major source of infectious EBV particles for salivary transmission. The biological events associated with nasopharyngeal epithelial cells are only beginning to be understood with the advancement of EBV infection methods and the availability of nasopharyngeal epithelial cell models for EBV infection studies. EBV infection in human epithelial cells is a highly inefficient process compared to that in B cells, which express the complement receptor type 2 (CR2) to mediate EBV infection. Although receptor(s) on the epithelial cell surface for EBV infection remain(s) to be identified, EBV infection in epithelial cells could be achieved via the interaction of glycoproteins on the viral envelope with surface integrins on epithelial cells, which might trigger membrane fusion to internalize EBV in cells. Normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells are not permissive for latent EBV infection, and EBV infection in normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells usually results in growth arrest. However, genetic alterations in premalignant nasopharyngeal epithelial cells, including p16 deletion and cyclin D1 overexpression, could override the growth inhibitory effect of EBV infection to support stable and latent EBV infection in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. The EBV episome in NPC is clonal in nature, suggesting that NPC develops from a single EBV-infected nasopharyngeal epithelial cell, and the establishment of persistent and latent EBV infection in premalignant nasopharyngeal epithelium may represent an early and critical event for NPC development.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cjcsysu.cn/-
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Journal of Cancer-
dc.titleEpstein-Barr virus infection and persistence in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTsang, CM: annatsan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailDeng, W: wdeng@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYip, YL: yimling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsao, GSW: gswtsao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTsang, CM=rp01964-
dc.identifier.authorityDeng, W=rp01640-
dc.identifier.authorityTsao, GSW=rp00399-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.5732/cjc.014.10169-
dc.identifier.pmid25223910-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4244318-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84909942991-
dc.identifier.hkuros246580-
dc.identifier.volume33-
dc.identifier.issue11-
dc.identifier.spage549-
dc.identifier.epage555-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000345261300005-
dc.publisher.placeChina-

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