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Article: Immunohistochemical Comparison of Ovarian and Uterine Endometrioid Carcinoma, Endometrioid Carcinoma With Clear Cell Change, and Clear Cell Carcinoma

TitleImmunohistochemical Comparison of Ovarian and Uterine Endometrioid Carcinoma, Endometrioid Carcinoma With Clear Cell Change, and Clear Cell Carcinoma
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajsp.com
Citation
American Journal of Surgical Pathology, 2015, v. 39 n. 8, p. 1061-1069 How to Cite?
AbstractAccurate distinction of clear cell carcinoma (CCC) from endometrioid carcinoma (EC) has important clinical implications, but, not infrequently, EC demonstrates clear cell change (EC-CC), mimicking CCC. We examined whether a panel of immunomarkers can help distinguish between these tumors. Sixty-four CCCs (40 ovarian and 24 uterine), 34 ECs (21 ovarian and 13 uterine), and 34 EC-CCs (6 ovarian and 28 uterine) were stained for HNF1[beta], BAF250a, Napsin A, ER, and PR. Intensity and extent of immunoreactivity was assessed. Fifty-seven of 64 (89%) CCCs, 14/34 (41%) EC-CCs, and 16/34 (47%) ECs expressed HNF1[beta], and 56/64 (88%) CCCs, 4/34 (12%) EC-CCs, and 1/34 (3%) ECs stained for Napsin A. Most CCCs demonstrated at least moderate and diffuse staining for both markers, whereas only focal and weak expression was identified in most EC-CC/EC. Compared to HNF1[beta], Napsin A showed increased specificity (93.0% vs. 55.9%, P<0.0001) and similar sensitivity (87.5% vs. 89.1%) in distinguishing CCC from EC-CC/EC. Thirteen of 64 (20%) CCCs, 6/34 (18%) EC-CCs, and 2/34 (6%) ECs showed loss of BAF250a. ER was expressed by 10/64 (16%) CCCs, 30/34 (88%) EC-CCs, and 33/34 (97%) ECs, whereas PR positivity was identified in 9/64 (14%) CCCs, 26/34 (77%) EC-CCs, and 33/34 (97%) ECs. The majority of EC and EC-CC demonstrated diffuse staining for ER/PR, whereas most CCCs showed very focal positivity. There is a statistically significant difference in HNF1[beta], Napsin A, ER, and PR immunoexpression between CCC and EC/EC-CC, with Napsin A being a more specific marker for CCC than HNF1[beta]. Overall, the immunoprofile of EC-CC is more comparable to that of EC than CCC. The use of a panel of immunostains can help distinguish EC-CC from CCC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214728
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.951
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.393

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLim, D-
dc.contributor.authorIp, PPC-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, ANY-
dc.contributor.authorKiyokawa, T-
dc.contributor.authorOliva, E-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T11:53:12Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T11:53:12Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Surgical Pathology, 2015, v. 39 n. 8, p. 1061-1069-
dc.identifier.issn0147-5185-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214728-
dc.description.abstractAccurate distinction of clear cell carcinoma (CCC) from endometrioid carcinoma (EC) has important clinical implications, but, not infrequently, EC demonstrates clear cell change (EC-CC), mimicking CCC. We examined whether a panel of immunomarkers can help distinguish between these tumors. Sixty-four CCCs (40 ovarian and 24 uterine), 34 ECs (21 ovarian and 13 uterine), and 34 EC-CCs (6 ovarian and 28 uterine) were stained for HNF1[beta], BAF250a, Napsin A, ER, and PR. Intensity and extent of immunoreactivity was assessed. Fifty-seven of 64 (89%) CCCs, 14/34 (41%) EC-CCs, and 16/34 (47%) ECs expressed HNF1[beta], and 56/64 (88%) CCCs, 4/34 (12%) EC-CCs, and 1/34 (3%) ECs stained for Napsin A. Most CCCs demonstrated at least moderate and diffuse staining for both markers, whereas only focal and weak expression was identified in most EC-CC/EC. Compared to HNF1[beta], Napsin A showed increased specificity (93.0% vs. 55.9%, P<0.0001) and similar sensitivity (87.5% vs. 89.1%) in distinguishing CCC from EC-CC/EC. Thirteen of 64 (20%) CCCs, 6/34 (18%) EC-CCs, and 2/34 (6%) ECs showed loss of BAF250a. ER was expressed by 10/64 (16%) CCCs, 30/34 (88%) EC-CCs, and 33/34 (97%) ECs, whereas PR positivity was identified in 9/64 (14%) CCCs, 26/34 (77%) EC-CCs, and 33/34 (97%) ECs. The majority of EC and EC-CC demonstrated diffuse staining for ER/PR, whereas most CCCs showed very focal positivity. There is a statistically significant difference in HNF1[beta], Napsin A, ER, and PR immunoexpression between CCC and EC/EC-CC, with Napsin A being a more specific marker for CCC than HNF1[beta]. Overall, the immunoprofile of EC-CC is more comparable to that of EC than CCC. The use of a panel of immunostains can help distinguish EC-CC from CCC.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajsp.com-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Surgical Pathology-
dc.titleImmunohistochemical Comparison of Ovarian and Uterine Endometrioid Carcinoma, Endometrioid Carcinoma With Clear Cell Change, and Clear Cell Carcinoma-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailIp, PPC: philipip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, ANY: anycheun@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, PPC=rp01890-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, ANY=rp00542-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/PAS.0000000000000436-
dc.identifier.pmid25871622-
dc.identifier.hkuros246029-
dc.identifier.hkuros244791-
dc.identifier.volume39-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage1061-
dc.identifier.epage1069-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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