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Article: Social Mobility and Stakeholder Leverages: Disadvantaged Students and “Important Others” in the “Glonacal” Construct of Higher Learning.

TitleSocial Mobility and Stakeholder Leverages: Disadvantaged Students and “Important Others” in the “Glonacal” Construct of Higher Learning.
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherJames Nicholas Publishers, Pty Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jamesnicholaspublishers.com.au/esjrnl.htm
Citation
Education and Society, 2015, v. 33 n. 1, p. 29-50 How to Cite?
AbstractDisadvantaged students increasingly confront ruthless competition for higher education degrees, while losing out on opportunities for social mobility. Some of Hong Kong’s low-income households defy the trend: families take on risk, including considerable debt, to send their offspring abroad, rather than test their chances at home by dealing with competitive learning silos, stratified schooling, social status anxiety, and failing employer support. Drawing on stakeholder theory, the “glonacal agency” heuristic and the existentialist perspective, this paper examines how some low-income families break the cycle of disadvantage by tapping into the powers, legitimacy and urgency of “important others,” allowing them to harness local and global resources to achieve social mobility.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214654
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOleksiyenko, PA-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T11:45:58Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T11:45:58Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationEducation and Society, 2015, v. 33 n. 1, p. 29-50-
dc.identifier.issn0726-2655-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214654-
dc.description.abstractDisadvantaged students increasingly confront ruthless competition for higher education degrees, while losing out on opportunities for social mobility. Some of Hong Kong’s low-income households defy the trend: families take on risk, including considerable debt, to send their offspring abroad, rather than test their chances at home by dealing with competitive learning silos, stratified schooling, social status anxiety, and failing employer support. Drawing on stakeholder theory, the “glonacal agency” heuristic and the existentialist perspective, this paper examines how some low-income families break the cycle of disadvantage by tapping into the powers, legitimacy and urgency of “important others,” allowing them to harness local and global resources to achieve social mobility.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJames Nicholas Publishers, Pty Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jamesnicholaspublishers.com.au/esjrnl.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofEducation and Society-
dc.titleSocial Mobility and Stakeholder Leverages: Disadvantaged Students and “Important Others” in the “Glonacal” Construct of Higher Learning.-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailOleksiyenko, PA: paoleks@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityOleksiyenko, PA=rp00945-
dc.identifier.doi10.7459/es/33.1.03-
dc.identifier.hkuros247674-
dc.identifier.volume33-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage29-
dc.identifier.epage50-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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