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Conference Paper: Smoking as predictor of relapse at 3 years following first-episode psychosis: a retrospective cohort study in Hong Kong

TitleSmoking as predictor of relapse at 3 years following first-episode psychosis: a retrospective cohort study in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Psychiatry and neurology
Issue Date2014
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1751-7885&site=1
Citation
The 9th International Conference on Early Psychosis (IEPA 2014), Tokyo, Japan, 17-19 November 2014. In Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 2014, v. 8 suppl. S1, p. 139, abstract C27 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: Relapses in psychosis are costly and may have irreversible consequences. Relapse prevention is therefore one of the most important and challenging targets in the treatment of psychotic disorder. Medication non-adherence is at present the only consistent relapse predictor with high predictive power. However, other consistent predictors have not been identified due to limitations in previous studies. We aim to investigate relapse predictors in a large cohort of patients with first-episode psychosis. METHOD: This is a retrospective cohort study designed to evaluate relapses in first-episode psychosis patients in 3 years. A total of 1400 patients ’ case records were retrieved from a hospital database. Potential relapse predictors including demographic variables, baseline clinical measures, medication adherence, and residual positive symptoms upon clinical stabilization were collected. RESULTS: The cumulative relapse rates were 19.3% by year 1, 38.4% by year 2, and 48.1% by year 3. Multivariate Cox-proportional hazards regression analysis revealed that medication non-adherence, smoking, schizophrenia diagnosis, younger age, and shorter baseline hospitalization were associated with an increased risk of relapse in 3 years. CONCLUSIONS: Nearly half of patients relapsed after 3 years following their fi rst-episode psychosis. Smoking as a predictor of relapse is an intriguing new finding supportive of a link between nicotinic receptors and the dopamine system. Their relationship deserves further investigations with potential clinical implications for relapse prevention.
DescriptionConference Theme: To the New Horizon
Poster Session C: Comorbid Conditions - First-Episode Psychosis: no. C27
This free Journal suppl. entitled: Special Issue: 9th International Conference on Early Psychosis – To the New Horizon ... Tokyo Japan
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214243
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.889
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.071

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, C-
dc.contributor.authorChang, WC-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SKW-
dc.contributor.authorLee, EHM-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.contributor.authorTang, JYM-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T11:00:14Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T11:00:14Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationThe 9th International Conference on Early Psychosis (IEPA 2014), Tokyo, Japan, 17-19 November 2014. In Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 2014, v. 8 suppl. S1, p. 139, abstract C27-
dc.identifier.issn1751-7885-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214243-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: To the New Horizon-
dc.descriptionPoster Session C: Comorbid Conditions - First-Episode Psychosis: no. C27-
dc.descriptionThis free Journal suppl. entitled: Special Issue: 9th International Conference on Early Psychosis – To the New Horizon ... Tokyo Japan-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Relapses in psychosis are costly and may have irreversible consequences. Relapse prevention is therefore one of the most important and challenging targets in the treatment of psychotic disorder. Medication non-adherence is at present the only consistent relapse predictor with high predictive power. However, other consistent predictors have not been identified due to limitations in previous studies. We aim to investigate relapse predictors in a large cohort of patients with first-episode psychosis. METHOD: This is a retrospective cohort study designed to evaluate relapses in first-episode psychosis patients in 3 years. A total of 1400 patients ’ case records were retrieved from a hospital database. Potential relapse predictors including demographic variables, baseline clinical measures, medication adherence, and residual positive symptoms upon clinical stabilization were collected. RESULTS: The cumulative relapse rates were 19.3% by year 1, 38.4% by year 2, and 48.1% by year 3. Multivariate Cox-proportional hazards regression analysis revealed that medication non-adherence, smoking, schizophrenia diagnosis, younger age, and shorter baseline hospitalization were associated with an increased risk of relapse in 3 years. CONCLUSIONS: Nearly half of patients relapsed after 3 years following their fi rst-episode psychosis. Smoking as a predictor of relapse is an intriguing new finding supportive of a link between nicotinic receptors and the dopamine system. Their relationship deserves further investigations with potential clinical implications for relapse prevention.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1751-7885&site=1-
dc.relation.ispartofEarly Intervention in Psychiatry-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectPsychiatry and neurology-
dc.titleSmoking as predictor of relapse at 3 years following first-episode psychosis: a retrospective cohort study in Hong Kong-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailHui, C: christyh@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, SKW: kwsherry@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, EHM: edwinlhm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTang, JYM: jennitym@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHui, C=rp01993-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SKW=rp00539-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, EHM=rp01575-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.identifier.authorityTang, JYM=rp01997-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/eip.12199-
dc.identifier.hkuros249102-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. S1-
dc.identifier.spage139, abstract C27-
dc.identifier.epage139, abstract C27-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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