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Article: Self-control, self-regulation, and doping in sport: A test of the strength-energy model

TitleSelf-control, self-regulation, and doping in sport: A test of the strength-energy model
Authors
KeywordsSport medicine
Psychology
Physical performance
Issue Date2015
Citation
Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 2015, v. 37, n. 2, p. 199-206 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc. We applied the strength-energy model of self-control to understand the relationship between self-control and young athletes' behavioral responses to taking illegal performance-enhancing substances, or "doping." Measures of trait self-control, attitude and intention toward doping, intention toward, and adherence to, doping-avoidant behaviors, and the prevention of unintended doping behaviors were administered to 410 young Australian athletes. Participants also completed a "lollipop" decision-making protocol that simulated avoidance of unintended doping. Hierarchical linear multiple regression analyses revealed that self-control was negatively associated with doping attitude and intention, and positively associated with the intention and adherence to doping-avoidant behaviors, and refusal to take or eat the unfamiliar candy offered in the "lollipop" protocol. Consistent with the strength-energy model, athletes with low self-control were more likely to have heightened attitude and intention toward doping, and reduced intention, behavioral adherence, and awareness of doping avoidance.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214068
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.379
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.237
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Derwin K C-
dc.contributor.authorLentillon-Kaestner, Vanessa-
dc.contributor.authorDimmock, James A.-
dc.contributor.authorDonovan, Robert J.-
dc.contributor.authorKeatley, David A.-
dc.contributor.authorHardcastle, Sarah J.-
dc.contributor.authorHagger, Martin S.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T13:41:45Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-19T13:41:45Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 2015, v. 37, n. 2, p. 199-206-
dc.identifier.issn0895-2779-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214068-
dc.description.abstract© 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc. We applied the strength-energy model of self-control to understand the relationship between self-control and young athletes' behavioral responses to taking illegal performance-enhancing substances, or "doping." Measures of trait self-control, attitude and intention toward doping, intention toward, and adherence to, doping-avoidant behaviors, and the prevention of unintended doping behaviors were administered to 410 young Australian athletes. Participants also completed a "lollipop" decision-making protocol that simulated avoidance of unintended doping. Hierarchical linear multiple regression analyses revealed that self-control was negatively associated with doping attitude and intention, and positively associated with the intention and adherence to doping-avoidant behaviors, and refusal to take or eat the unfamiliar candy offered in the "lollipop" protocol. Consistent with the strength-energy model, athletes with low self-control were more likely to have heightened attitude and intention toward doping, and reduced intention, behavioral adherence, and awareness of doping avoidance.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychology-
dc.subjectSport medicine-
dc.subjectPsychology-
dc.subjectPhysical performance-
dc.titleSelf-control, self-regulation, and doping in sport: A test of the strength-energy model-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1123/jsep.2014-0250-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84940822910-
dc.identifier.volume37-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage199-
dc.identifier.epage206-
dc.identifier.eissn1543-2904-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000355571600008-

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