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Article: Hot pants at the border: Sorting sex work from trafficking

TitleHot pants at the border: Sorting sex work from trafficking
Authors
KeywordsBorder control
Immigration
Sex work
Women
Borders
Issue Date2014
Citation
British Journal of Criminology, 2014, v. 54, n. 1, p. 2-19 How to Cite?
AbstractThe role of borders in managing sex work is a valuable site for analysing the relationship between criminal justice and migration administration functions. For the purposes of this article, we are concerned with how generalized concerns around trafficking manifest in specific interactions between immigration officials and women travellers. To this end, this article contributes to a greater understanding of the micro-politics of border control and the various contradictions at work in the everyday performance of the border. It uses an intersectional analysis of the decision making of immigration officers at the border to understand how social differences become conflated with risk, how different social locations amplify what is read as risky sexuality and how sexuality is constructed in migration. What the interviews in our research have demonstrated is that, while the border is a poor site for identifying cases of trafficking into the sex industry, it is a site of significant social sorting where various intersections of intelligence-led profiling and everyday stereotyping of women, sex work and vulnerability play out. © 2013 © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies (ISTD). All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214028
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.643
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.373

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPickering, Sharon-
dc.contributor.authorHam, Julie-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T13:41:35Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-19T13:41:35Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Criminology, 2014, v. 54, n. 1, p. 2-19-
dc.identifier.issn0007-0955-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214028-
dc.description.abstractThe role of borders in managing sex work is a valuable site for analysing the relationship between criminal justice and migration administration functions. For the purposes of this article, we are concerned with how generalized concerns around trafficking manifest in specific interactions between immigration officials and women travellers. To this end, this article contributes to a greater understanding of the micro-politics of border control and the various contradictions at work in the everyday performance of the border. It uses an intersectional analysis of the decision making of immigration officers at the border to understand how social differences become conflated with risk, how different social locations amplify what is read as risky sexuality and how sexuality is constructed in migration. What the interviews in our research have demonstrated is that, while the border is a poor site for identifying cases of trafficking into the sex industry, it is a site of significant social sorting where various intersections of intelligence-led profiling and everyday stereotyping of women, sex work and vulnerability play out. © 2013 © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies (ISTD). All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Criminology-
dc.subjectBorder control-
dc.subjectImmigration-
dc.subjectSex work-
dc.subjectWomen-
dc.subjectBorders-
dc.titleHot pants at the border: Sorting sex work from trafficking-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bjc/azt060-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84890171019-
dc.identifier.volume54-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage2-
dc.identifier.epage19-
dc.identifier.eissn1464-3529-

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