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Article: Adjuvant chemoradiation for resected gastric cancer: A 10-year experience

TitleAdjuvant chemoradiation for resected gastric cancer: A 10-year experience
Authors
KeywordsPrognosis
Gastric neoplasm
Gastrectomy
Toxicity
Combined modality therapy
Issue Date2011
Citation
Gastric Cancer, 2011, v. 14, n. 1, p. 63-71 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The Intergroup 0116 study demonstrated that concurrent chemoradiation improved overall survival (OS) in resected gastric cancer. However, there are few reports focusing on late toxicity and factors governing prognosis. This study aimed to determine these two important aspects for employing this regimen. Methods: Patients with resected gastric cancer stage IB to IV (M0) disease, treated between July 1998 and December 2007, were analyzed. The majority of the patients were treated using 5 cycles of 5-fluorouracil (5FU)/leucovorin chemotherapy with 45 Gy/25 fractions radiotherapy concurrent with cycles 2 and 3, as per the Intergroup 0116 study. Results: We treated 120 patients (107 standard protocol, 13 with concurrent 5FU alone), and 14% had a close or positive margin. Median age was 59 years (35-79 years). Acute toxicity ≥ grade 3 was seen in 66% of all patients (hematological 61%, stomatitis 3%, diarrhea 6%, vomiting 2%). Median follow-up was 33 months (range 6-125 months). Five-year OS and relapse-free survival were 51 and 54%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, surgical margin status, stage of the disease, and radiotherapy with computed tomography (CT) planning were important prognostic factors. Anemia and gastritis were the two most frequently occurring late complications, though they were usually mild and asymptomatic. Clinically significant renal impairment was uncommon. Other rare complications included intestinal obstruction, malabsorption, hypertension, and secondary malignancy. Conclusions: Postoperative chemoradiation is safe and late toxicity is usually mild in extent. Results were comparable to the Intergroup 0116 study. R0 resection is of utmost importance and radiotherapy should best be delivered by conformal techniques. © 2011 The International Gastric Cancer Association and The Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213947
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.404
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.387

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChang, Amy T Y-
dc.contributor.authorNg, Wai Tong-
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Ada L Y-
dc.contributor.authorKu, Ki Man-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Michael C H-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Anne W M-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T13:41:19Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-19T13:41:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationGastric Cancer, 2011, v. 14, n. 1, p. 63-71-
dc.identifier.issn1436-3291-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213947-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The Intergroup 0116 study demonstrated that concurrent chemoradiation improved overall survival (OS) in resected gastric cancer. However, there are few reports focusing on late toxicity and factors governing prognosis. This study aimed to determine these two important aspects for employing this regimen. Methods: Patients with resected gastric cancer stage IB to IV (M0) disease, treated between July 1998 and December 2007, were analyzed. The majority of the patients were treated using 5 cycles of 5-fluorouracil (5FU)/leucovorin chemotherapy with 45 Gy/25 fractions radiotherapy concurrent with cycles 2 and 3, as per the Intergroup 0116 study. Results: We treated 120 patients (107 standard protocol, 13 with concurrent 5FU alone), and 14% had a close or positive margin. Median age was 59 years (35-79 years). Acute toxicity ≥ grade 3 was seen in 66% of all patients (hematological 61%, stomatitis 3%, diarrhea 6%, vomiting 2%). Median follow-up was 33 months (range 6-125 months). Five-year OS and relapse-free survival were 51 and 54%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, surgical margin status, stage of the disease, and radiotherapy with computed tomography (CT) planning were important prognostic factors. Anemia and gastritis were the two most frequently occurring late complications, though they were usually mild and asymptomatic. Clinically significant renal impairment was uncommon. Other rare complications included intestinal obstruction, malabsorption, hypertension, and secondary malignancy. Conclusions: Postoperative chemoradiation is safe and late toxicity is usually mild in extent. Results were comparable to the Intergroup 0116 study. R0 resection is of utmost importance and radiotherapy should best be delivered by conformal techniques. © 2011 The International Gastric Cancer Association and The Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofGastric Cancer-
dc.subjectPrognosis-
dc.subjectGastric neoplasm-
dc.subjectGastrectomy-
dc.subjectToxicity-
dc.subjectCombined modality therapy-
dc.titleAdjuvant chemoradiation for resected gastric cancer: A 10-year experience-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10120-011-0011-y-
dc.identifier.pmid21327926-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79953029882-
dc.identifier.hkuros266250-
dc.identifier.volume14-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage63-
dc.identifier.epage71-

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