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Article: Clonal diversity of CTX-M-producing, multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli from rodents

TitleClonal diversity of CTX-M-producing, multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli from rodents
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.org
Citation
Journal of Medical Microbiology, 2015, v. 64 n. 2, p. 185-190 How to Cite?
AbstractThis territory-wide study investigated the occurrence of faecal carriage of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli among wild rodents from the 18 districts in Hong Kong. Individual rectal swabs were obtained from the trapped animals and cultured in plain and selective media. A total of 965 wild rodents [148 chestnut spiny rats (Niviventer fulvescens), 326 Indo-Chinese forest rats (Rattus andamanensis), 452 brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) and 39 black rats (Rattus rattus)] were sampled. ESBL carriage was 0 % in chestnut spiny rats, 0.6 % in Indo-Chinese forest rats, 7.7 % in black rats and 13.9 % in brown rats. Among brown rats, the prevalence of ESBL carriage differed markedly by geographical location: absent in two districts, low (7–10 %) in six districts, moderate (11–19 %) in seven districts and high (21–50 %) in three districts. Nonetheless, there was no correlation between the prevalence of ESBL in brown rats and human population density in the 18 districts. CTX-M-type enzymes were detected in 92.0 % of the ESBL-producing isolates, of which 83.1 % were resistant to three or more non-β-lactam drugs. The CTX-M producing isolates were genetically diverse but a large proportion (47.8 %) were included in six successful clones that are strongly associated with human diseases and CTX-M dissemination, viz. sequence type complex [STC]10/phylogroup A, STC23/phylogroup B1, STC38/phylogroup D, STC155/phylogroup B1, ST405/phylogroup D and ST131/phylogroup B2. In conclusion, our results show that brown rats often carry potentially zoonotic clones of CTX-M producing, multidrug-resistant E. coli. The potential for rats to be a source of CTX-M producing E. coli for humans deserves further consideration.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213729
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.269
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.060
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, PL-
dc.contributor.authorLo, WU-
dc.contributor.authorLai, ELY-
dc.contributor.authorLaw, PYT-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, MH-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y-
dc.contributor.authorChow, KH-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-14T03:20:43Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-14T03:20:43Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Medical Microbiology, 2015, v. 64 n. 2, p. 185-190-
dc.identifier.issn0022-2615-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213729-
dc.description.abstractThis territory-wide study investigated the occurrence of faecal carriage of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli among wild rodents from the 18 districts in Hong Kong. Individual rectal swabs were obtained from the trapped animals and cultured in plain and selective media. A total of 965 wild rodents [148 chestnut spiny rats (Niviventer fulvescens), 326 Indo-Chinese forest rats (Rattus andamanensis), 452 brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) and 39 black rats (Rattus rattus)] were sampled. ESBL carriage was 0 % in chestnut spiny rats, 0.6 % in Indo-Chinese forest rats, 7.7 % in black rats and 13.9 % in brown rats. Among brown rats, the prevalence of ESBL carriage differed markedly by geographical location: absent in two districts, low (7–10 %) in six districts, moderate (11–19 %) in seven districts and high (21–50 %) in three districts. Nonetheless, there was no correlation between the prevalence of ESBL in brown rats and human population density in the 18 districts. CTX-M-type enzymes were detected in 92.0 % of the ESBL-producing isolates, of which 83.1 % were resistant to three or more non-β-lactam drugs. The CTX-M producing isolates were genetically diverse but a large proportion (47.8 %) were included in six successful clones that are strongly associated with human diseases and CTX-M dissemination, viz. sequence type complex [STC]10/phylogroup A, STC23/phylogroup B1, STC38/phylogroup D, STC155/phylogroup B1, ST405/phylogroup D and ST131/phylogroup B2. In conclusion, our results show that brown rats often carry potentially zoonotic clones of CTX-M producing, multidrug-resistant E. coli. The potential for rats to be a source of CTX-M producing E. coli for humans deserves further consideration.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.org-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Microbiology-
dc.rightsJournal of Medical Microbiology. Copyright © Society for General Microbiology.-
dc.rightsThis is an author manuscript that has been accepted for publication in Journal of Medical Microbiology, copyright Society for General Microbiology, but has not been copy-edited, formatted or proofed. Cite this article as appearing in Journal of Medical Microbiology. This version of the manuscript may not be duplicated or reproduced, other than for personal use or within the rule of 'Fair Use of Copyrighted Materials' (section 17, Title 17, US Code), without permission from the copyright owner, Society for General Microbiology. The Society for General Microbiology disclaims any responsibility or liability for errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or in any version derived from it by any other parties. The final copy-edited, published article, which is the version of record, can be found at http://jmm.sgmjournals.org, and is freely available without a subscription-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleClonal diversity of CTX-M-producing, multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli from rodents-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHo, PL: plho@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLo, WU: stephlo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLai, ELY: elylai@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChow, KH: khchowb@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PL=rp00406-
dc.identifier.authorityChow, KH=rp00370-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1099/jmm.0.000001-0-
dc.identifier.pmid25627207-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84921883405-
dc.identifier.hkuros246368-
dc.identifier.hkuros246370-
dc.identifier.volume64-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage185-
dc.identifier.epage190-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000355787500008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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