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Conference Paper: PBL2.0: Redesigning Problem-Based Curricula for 21st-Century Learning

TitlePBL2.0: Redesigning Problem-Based Curricula for 21st-Century Learning
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
The 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AREA 2015), Chicago, IL., 16-20 April 2015. How to Cite?
AbstractAn original rationale for the introduction of problem-based learning (PBL) in medical education in the 1960s was to support the management of the exponentially expanding amount of scientific data and resources available. Progenitors (Barrows, 1988) aimed to design curricula that would enable students to retrieve, process and analyze data within the structure of an inquiry-based framework (Hmelo-Silver, 2004, Lu, Bridges & Hmelo-Silver, 2014). Skilled facilitation of information seeking, sorting, critiquing and applying within the process of understanding the dimensions of ill-defined, clinically relevant problems was seen as supporting a ‘flexible’ approach towards knowledge (Hmelo-Silver & Barrows, 2008). The information explosion argument for the use of such inquiry-led curricula remains just as, if not even more, cogent than 40 years ago. Undergraduate health sciences students (and their patients) can access an almost infinite amount of online information from under-researched opinion pieces to sharing of ...
DescriptionMeeting Theme: Toward Justice: Culture, Language, and Heritage in Education Research and Praxis
Session: 61.046 - Uncovering Intellectual and Conceptual Underpinnings of Innovative and Nontraditional Contexts for Learning Across Disciplines: no. 5
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213537

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBridges, S-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-05T03:11:14Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-05T03:11:14Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AREA 2015), Chicago, IL., 16-20 April 2015.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213537-
dc.descriptionMeeting Theme: Toward Justice: Culture, Language, and Heritage in Education Research and Praxis-
dc.descriptionSession: 61.046 - Uncovering Intellectual and Conceptual Underpinnings of Innovative and Nontraditional Contexts for Learning Across Disciplines: no. 5-
dc.description.abstractAn original rationale for the introduction of problem-based learning (PBL) in medical education in the 1960s was to support the management of the exponentially expanding amount of scientific data and resources available. Progenitors (Barrows, 1988) aimed to design curricula that would enable students to retrieve, process and analyze data within the structure of an inquiry-based framework (Hmelo-Silver, 2004, Lu, Bridges & Hmelo-Silver, 2014). Skilled facilitation of information seeking, sorting, critiquing and applying within the process of understanding the dimensions of ill-defined, clinically relevant problems was seen as supporting a ‘flexible’ approach towards knowledge (Hmelo-Silver & Barrows, 2008). The information explosion argument for the use of such inquiry-led curricula remains just as, if not even more, cogent than 40 years ago. Undergraduate health sciences students (and their patients) can access an almost infinite amount of online information from under-researched opinion pieces to sharing of ...-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, AREA 2015-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titlePBL2.0: Redesigning Problem-Based Curricula for 21st-Century Learning-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailBridges, S: sbridges@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityBridges, S=rp00048-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros247033-

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