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Article: Future herbivory: The indirect effects of enriched CO2 may rival its direct effects

TitleFuture herbivory: The indirect effects of enriched CO2 may rival its direct effects
Authors
KeywordsHabitat loss
Turf-forming algae
Phase-shifts
Ocean acidification
Carbon dioxide
Climate change
Issue Date2013
Citation
Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2013, v. 492, p. 85-95 How to Cite?
AbstractVariation in rates of herbivory may be driven by direct effects of the abiotic environment on grazers, as well as indirect effects mediated by their food. Disentangling these direct and indirect effects is of fundamental importance for ecological forecasts of changing climate on species interactions and their influence on biogenic habitat. Whilst elevated atmospheric CO 2 may have direct effects on grazers with calcareous structures via 'ocean acidification', it may also have indirect effects via changes caused to their food. In our study we initially tested, and confirmed, that enriched CO2 altered per capita rates of grazing before assessing the relative importance of indirect and direct effects in driving this response. Our results eliminated the model of a direct effect of CO2 enrichment on the grazers themselves and supported the model of an indirect effect driven by a change in the food (i.e. turf algae). We suggest that this indirect effect manifested as grazers responded to the increased nitrogen content (i.e. %N) of algal tissue that resulted under CO2 enrichment. Understanding such indirect effects of modified environmental conditions provide important mechanistic links between climate conditions and the ecological processes they influence. © 2013 Inter-Research.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213365
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.554

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFalkenberg, Laura J.-
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Bayden D.-
dc.contributor.authorConnell, Sean D.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T04:07:02Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-28T04:07:02Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology Progress Series, 2013, v. 492, p. 85-95-
dc.identifier.issn0171-8630-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213365-
dc.description.abstractVariation in rates of herbivory may be driven by direct effects of the abiotic environment on grazers, as well as indirect effects mediated by their food. Disentangling these direct and indirect effects is of fundamental importance for ecological forecasts of changing climate on species interactions and their influence on biogenic habitat. Whilst elevated atmospheric CO 2 may have direct effects on grazers with calcareous structures via 'ocean acidification', it may also have indirect effects via changes caused to their food. In our study we initially tested, and confirmed, that enriched CO2 altered per capita rates of grazing before assessing the relative importance of indirect and direct effects in driving this response. Our results eliminated the model of a direct effect of CO2 enrichment on the grazers themselves and supported the model of an indirect effect driven by a change in the food (i.e. turf algae). We suggest that this indirect effect manifested as grazers responded to the increased nitrogen content (i.e. %N) of algal tissue that resulted under CO2 enrichment. Understanding such indirect effects of modified environmental conditions provide important mechanistic links between climate conditions and the ecological processes they influence. © 2013 Inter-Research.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Ecology Progress Series-
dc.subjectHabitat loss-
dc.subjectTurf-forming algae-
dc.subjectPhase-shifts-
dc.subjectOcean acidification-
dc.subjectCarbon dioxide-
dc.subjectClimate change-
dc.titleFuture herbivory: The indirect effects of enriched CO2 may rival its direct effects-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps10491-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84887430202-
dc.identifier.volume492-
dc.identifier.spage85-
dc.identifier.epage95-

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