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Article: Video rate atomic force microscopy: Use of compressive scanning for nanoscale video imaging

TitleVideo rate atomic force microscopy: Use of compressive scanning for nanoscale video imaging
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, 2013, v. 7, n. 1, p. 4-8 How to Cite?
AbstractAtomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a powerful instrument for studying and exploring the nanoworld [1]. AFM can obtain ultrahigh-resolution images at the subnanoscale level. However, AFM has a very significant drawback of slow imaging speed, which is due to its working principle. A conventional AFM conducts a raster scan of an entire area to generate a topography image. Therefore, the frame rate is low, making it impossible for observation of biological and physical processes that are dynamic in nature with a lifespan of a few minutes or even seconds, such as the structural change of cells, carbon nanotube shape change, and so forth [2]?[5]. In addition, for AFM-based nanomanipulations and nanomeasurement, the low frame rate makes it difficult to achieve a real-time visual guide manipulation [6], [7]. Operators usually have to wait for finishing imaging to visualize the manipulating results. Therefore, there is an increasing demand on a fast-imaging AFM system that can capture a continuous phenomenon occurring in seconds. © 2013 IEEE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213300

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXi, Ning-
dc.contributor.authorSong, Bo-
dc.contributor.authorYang, Ruiguo-
dc.contributor.authorLai, King-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hongzhi-
dc.contributor.authorQu, Chengeng-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Liangliang-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T04:06:49Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-28T04:06:49Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationIEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, 2013, v. 7, n. 1, p. 4-8-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213300-
dc.description.abstractAtomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a powerful instrument for studying and exploring the nanoworld [1]. AFM can obtain ultrahigh-resolution images at the subnanoscale level. However, AFM has a very significant drawback of slow imaging speed, which is due to its working principle. A conventional AFM conducts a raster scan of an entire area to generate a topography image. Therefore, the frame rate is low, making it impossible for observation of biological and physical processes that are dynamic in nature with a lifespan of a few minutes or even seconds, such as the structural change of cells, carbon nanotube shape change, and so forth [2]?[5]. In addition, for AFM-based nanomanipulations and nanomeasurement, the low frame rate makes it difficult to achieve a real-time visual guide manipulation [6], [7]. Operators usually have to wait for finishing imaging to visualize the manipulating results. Therefore, there is an increasing demand on a fast-imaging AFM system that can capture a continuous phenomenon occurring in seconds. © 2013 IEEE.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofIEEE Nanotechnology Magazine-
dc.titleVideo rate atomic force microscopy: Use of compressive scanning for nanoscale video imaging-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/MNANO.2013.2237711-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84875725441-
dc.identifier.volume7-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage4-
dc.identifier.epage8-

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